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Article: Nanotopographical Surfaces for Regulating Cellular Mechanical Behaviors Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy

TitleNanotopographical Surfaces for Regulating Cellular Mechanical Behaviors Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy
Authors
Keywordsatomic force microscopy
cell−substrate interactions
nanotopographical surface
nanogranular deposition
surface roughness
Issue Date2019
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/toc/abseba/current
Citation
ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, 2019, v. 5 n. 10, p. 5036-5050 How to Cite?
AbstractCell–substrate interactions play an important role in regulating cellular physiological and pathological processes, and therefore, investigating cell–substrate interface is meaningful for understanding the behaviors of cells. However, so far, the underlying mechanisms which guide the nanoscopic biological activities taking place at the cell–substrate interface remain poorly understood. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for characterizing the structures and properties of native biological and biomaterial systems with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution, which offers new possibilities for understanding the physical sciences of biomaterials. Here, AFM was utilized to unravel the nanotopographical surfaces for regulating cellular behaviors on three different substrates (glass slide, mica, and Petri dish). First, the decellularized substrates prepared with the use of ammonia and trypsin were imaged by AFM, significantly showing the nanogranular substances on the decellularized substrates as well as the cell membrane patches for uncovering the detailed situations of mechanical contact between cells and substrates. Next, experiments performed on chemically fixed substrates with the use of paraformaldehyde together with AFM time-lapse imaging remarkably showed that nanogranular depositions from the cell culture medium appeared on the substrates for promoting cell growth. Further, the detailed cell culture medium components which contribute to the nanogranular depositions are identified. Finally, the dynamic alterations in surface roughness and mechanical properties of substrates and cells during cell growth were quantitatively measured by AFM, revealing the diverse changes of the multiple physical properties (surface roughness, adhesion force, Young’s modulus, and relaxation time) during cell–substrate interactions. The research provides novel insights into the nanotopographical surfaces for cell–substrate interactions, which will be useful for understanding cellular behaviors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282922
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.749
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.082
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLI, M-
dc.contributor.authorXi, N-
dc.contributor.authorWANG, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLIU, L-
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-05T06:23:05Z-
dc.date.available2020-06-05T06:23:05Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, 2019, v. 5 n. 10, p. 5036-5050-
dc.identifier.issn2373-9878-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282922-
dc.description.abstractCell–substrate interactions play an important role in regulating cellular physiological and pathological processes, and therefore, investigating cell–substrate interface is meaningful for understanding the behaviors of cells. However, so far, the underlying mechanisms which guide the nanoscopic biological activities taking place at the cell–substrate interface remain poorly understood. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for characterizing the structures and properties of native biological and biomaterial systems with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution, which offers new possibilities for understanding the physical sciences of biomaterials. Here, AFM was utilized to unravel the nanotopographical surfaces for regulating cellular behaviors on three different substrates (glass slide, mica, and Petri dish). First, the decellularized substrates prepared with the use of ammonia and trypsin were imaged by AFM, significantly showing the nanogranular substances on the decellularized substrates as well as the cell membrane patches for uncovering the detailed situations of mechanical contact between cells and substrates. Next, experiments performed on chemically fixed substrates with the use of paraformaldehyde together with AFM time-lapse imaging remarkably showed that nanogranular depositions from the cell culture medium appeared on the substrates for promoting cell growth. Further, the detailed cell culture medium components which contribute to the nanogranular depositions are identified. Finally, the dynamic alterations in surface roughness and mechanical properties of substrates and cells during cell growth were quantitatively measured by AFM, revealing the diverse changes of the multiple physical properties (surface roughness, adhesion force, Young’s modulus, and relaxation time) during cell–substrate interactions. The research provides novel insights into the nanotopographical surfaces for cell–substrate interactions, which will be useful for understanding cellular behaviors.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/toc/abseba/current-
dc.relation.ispartofACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering-
dc.rightsThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.9b00991-
dc.subjectatomic force microscopy-
dc.subjectcell−substrate interactions-
dc.subjectnanotopographical surface-
dc.subjectnanogranular deposition-
dc.subjectsurface roughness-
dc.titleNanotopographical Surfaces for Regulating Cellular Mechanical Behaviors Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXi, N: xining@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityXi, N=rp02044-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acsbiomaterials.9b00991-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85074559480-
dc.identifier.hkuros310078-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage5036-
dc.identifier.epage5050-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000490658800015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl2373-9878-

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