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Article: Chief sustainability officers and corporate social (Ir)responsibility

TitleChief sustainability officers and corporate social (Ir)responsibility
Authors
Keywordsattention‐based view
chief sustainability officer
corporate social (ir)responsibility
top management team
upper echelons theory
Issue Date2020
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0143-2095
Citation
Strategic Management Journal, 2020, v. 41 n. 4, p. 656-680 How to Cite?
AbstractResearch Summary: How will a chief sustainability officer (CSO) influence corporate social performance? Building upon the upper echelons perspective and the attention‐based view, this study argues that while a CSO helps channel managerial attention to a firm's social domain, managerial attention is more likely to be directed to negative issues than to positive issues. In addition, such relationships are contingent on the focal firm's governance design and its industry culpability. Analysis of a sample of S&P 500 firms for the period of 2005–2014 largely renders support to our predictions. Managerial Summary: While more and more firms start to put a chief sustainability officer (CSO) on its top management team (TMT), the implications for corporate social performance of CSO presence remain unclear. With a sample of S&P 500 firms, we find that the presence of a CSO increases the firm's socially responsible activities (CSR) and reduces its socially irresponsible activities (CSiR). Moreover, CSO presence has a greater effect on reducing CSiR than on increasing CSR. These relationships become stronger when the firm has a sustainability committee on the board and is in a culpable industry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281847
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 5.471
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.278

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFu, R-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChen, G-
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-03T07:22:38Z-
dc.date.available2020-04-03T07:22:38Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationStrategic Management Journal, 2020, v. 41 n. 4, p. 656-680-
dc.identifier.issn0143-2095-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281847-
dc.description.abstractResearch Summary: How will a chief sustainability officer (CSO) influence corporate social performance? Building upon the upper echelons perspective and the attention‐based view, this study argues that while a CSO helps channel managerial attention to a firm's social domain, managerial attention is more likely to be directed to negative issues than to positive issues. In addition, such relationships are contingent on the focal firm's governance design and its industry culpability. Analysis of a sample of S&P 500 firms for the period of 2005–2014 largely renders support to our predictions. Managerial Summary: While more and more firms start to put a chief sustainability officer (CSO) on its top management team (TMT), the implications for corporate social performance of CSO presence remain unclear. With a sample of S&P 500 firms, we find that the presence of a CSO increases the firm's socially responsible activities (CSR) and reduces its socially irresponsible activities (CSiR). Moreover, CSO presence has a greater effect on reducing CSiR than on increasing CSR. These relationships become stronger when the firm has a sustainability committee on the board and is in a culpable industry.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0143-2095-
dc.relation.ispartofStrategic Management Journal-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectattention‐based view-
dc.subjectchief sustainability officer-
dc.subjectcorporate social (ir)responsibility-
dc.subjecttop management team-
dc.subjectupper echelons theory-
dc.titleChief sustainability officers and corporate social (Ir)responsibility-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTang, Y: msytang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTang, Y=rp02574-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/smj.3113-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85076102223-
dc.identifier.hkuros309657-
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage656-
dc.identifier.epage680-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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