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Article: Long-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter and mortality from renal failure: a retrospective cohort study in Hong Kong

TitleLong-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter and mortality from renal failure: a retrospective cohort study in Hong Kong
Authors
Keywordsfine particulate matter
renal failure
chronic kidney disease
long-term residential exposure
Issue Date2020
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal of Epidemiology, 2020, Epub 2020-01-06 How to Cite?
AbstractNumerous studies have indicated the ambient particulate matter is closely associated with increased cardiovascular disease, yet the evidence for its association with the renal disease remains under-recognized. We aimed to estimate the association between long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and renal failure (RF) mortality among participants of the Elderly Health Service Cohort in Hong Kong from 1998 to 2010. PM2.5 concentration at the residential address of each participant was estimated based on a satellite-based spatiotemporal model. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate the risks of overall renal failure (RF) and cause-specific mortality associated with PM2.5. After excluding 5,373 subjects without information on the residential address or relevant covariates, a total of 61,447 participants were included in data analyses. We totally identified 443 RF deaths during the 10 years of follow-up. For an interquartile-range increase in PM2.5 concentrations (3.22 μg/m3), hazard ratios of RF mortality were 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06 to 1.43) among all cohort participants and 1.42 (95% CI: 1.16 to 1.74) among patients with chronic kidney disease. Long-term exposure to atmospheric PM2.5 might be an important risk factor of RF mortality in the elderly population, especially among participants with existing renal diseases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281662
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.047

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRAN, J-
dc.contributor.authorYang, A-
dc.contributor.authorSUN, S-
dc.contributor.authorHan, L-
dc.contributor.authorLi, J-
dc.contributor.authorGUO, F-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, S-
dc.contributor.authorYANG, Y-
dc.contributor.authorMASON, TG-
dc.contributor.authorChan, K-P-
dc.contributor.authorLee, RS-Y-
dc.contributor.authorQiu, H-
dc.contributor.authorTian, L-
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-22T04:17:57Z-
dc.date.available2020-03-22T04:17:57Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Epidemiology, 2020, Epub 2020-01-06-
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281662-
dc.description.abstractNumerous studies have indicated the ambient particulate matter is closely associated with increased cardiovascular disease, yet the evidence for its association with the renal disease remains under-recognized. We aimed to estimate the association between long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and renal failure (RF) mortality among participants of the Elderly Health Service Cohort in Hong Kong from 1998 to 2010. PM2.5 concentration at the residential address of each participant was estimated based on a satellite-based spatiotemporal model. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate the risks of overall renal failure (RF) and cause-specific mortality associated with PM2.5. After excluding 5,373 subjects without information on the residential address or relevant covariates, a total of 61,447 participants were included in data analyses. We totally identified 443 RF deaths during the 10 years of follow-up. For an interquartile-range increase in PM2.5 concentrations (3.22 μg/m3), hazard ratios of RF mortality were 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06 to 1.43) among all cohort participants and 1.42 (95% CI: 1.16 to 1.74) among patients with chronic kidney disease. Long-term exposure to atmospheric PM2.5 might be an important risk factor of RF mortality in the elderly population, especially among participants with existing renal diseases.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiology-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here].-
dc.subjectfine particulate matter-
dc.subjectrenal failure-
dc.subjectchronic kidney disease-
dc.subjectlong-term residential exposure-
dc.titleLong-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter and mortality from renal failure: a retrospective cohort study in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLi, J: claire20@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, K-P: kpchanaa@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTian, L: linweit@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTian, L=rp01991-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwz282-
dc.identifier.hkuros309389-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-01-06-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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