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Article: Does A Trusted Leader Always Behave Better? The Relationship Between Leader Feeling Trusted by Employees and Benevolent and Laissez-Faire Leadership Behaviors

TitleDoes A Trusted Leader Always Behave Better? The Relationship Between Leader Feeling Trusted by Employees and Benevolent and Laissez-Faire Leadership Behaviors
Authors
KeywordsBenevolent leadership behavior
Felt obligation
Laissez-faire leadership behavior
Leader feeling trusted
Moral credits
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0167-4544
Citation
Journal of Business Ethics, 2019, Epub 2019-12-23 How to Cite?
AbstractThe concept of feeling trusted, which has received far less attention from researchers than trusting, refers to the trustee’s awareness of trustor’s exposed vulnerability and positive expectations. Previous research has merely centered on employees’ feeling of being trusted by their leaders and its influences on their work-related outcomes, but there is little work about the impact of leader feeling trusted by employees. Grounded in social exchange theory and moral licensing theory, the current research centers on explaining why leaders’ sense of being trusted by employees brings about both positive and negative reactions and considering how leaders’ moral identity moderates these effects. One qualitative study (Study 1) and two quantitative studies (Study 2 and Study 3) were conducted to examine the benefits and drawbacks of leader feeling trusted. Results demonstrated that leader feeling trusted has two main consequences: (1) trusted leaders are more likely to have strong feelings of obligation toward their subordinates, and further engage in benevolent leadership behavior to repay the kindness; and (2) leaders’ sense of being trusted may be conducive to the accumulation of moral credits, thereby stimulating leaders to display laissez-faire leadership behavior. Additionally, our findings indicate that the leader’s moral identity would affect the decisions of the trusted leader to behave better or worse, which promotes benevolent leadership behavior through enhanced felt obligation, and lessens laissez-faire leadership behavior via reduced moral credits.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281161
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.141
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.358

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCHEN, X-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Z-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, J-
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-09T09:51:00Z-
dc.date.available2020-03-09T09:51:00Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Business Ethics, 2019, Epub 2019-12-23-
dc.identifier.issn0167-4544-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281161-
dc.description.abstractThe concept of feeling trusted, which has received far less attention from researchers than trusting, refers to the trustee’s awareness of trustor’s exposed vulnerability and positive expectations. Previous research has merely centered on employees’ feeling of being trusted by their leaders and its influences on their work-related outcomes, but there is little work about the impact of leader feeling trusted by employees. Grounded in social exchange theory and moral licensing theory, the current research centers on explaining why leaders’ sense of being trusted by employees brings about both positive and negative reactions and considering how leaders’ moral identity moderates these effects. One qualitative study (Study 1) and two quantitative studies (Study 2 and Study 3) were conducted to examine the benefits and drawbacks of leader feeling trusted. Results demonstrated that leader feeling trusted has two main consequences: (1) trusted leaders are more likely to have strong feelings of obligation toward their subordinates, and further engage in benevolent leadership behavior to repay the kindness; and (2) leaders’ sense of being trusted may be conducive to the accumulation of moral credits, thereby stimulating leaders to display laissez-faire leadership behavior. Additionally, our findings indicate that the leader’s moral identity would affect the decisions of the trusted leader to behave better or worse, which promotes benevolent leadership behavior through enhanced felt obligation, and lessens laissez-faire leadership behavior via reduced moral credits.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0167-4544-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Business Ethics-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [insert journal title]. The final authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectBenevolent leadership behavior-
dc.subjectFelt obligation-
dc.subjectLaissez-faire leadership behavior-
dc.subjectLeader feeling trusted-
dc.subjectMoral credits-
dc.titleDoes A Trusted Leader Always Behave Better? The Relationship Between Leader Feeling Trusted by Employees and Benevolent and Laissez-Faire Leadership Behaviors-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCHEN, X: chenxingwen@connect.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10551-019-04390-7-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85076910221-
dc.identifier.hkuros309346-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2019-12-23-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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