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Article: Survey on self-reported psychotropic drug prescribing practices of eating disorder psychiatrists for the treatment of young people with anorexia nervosa

TitleSurvey on self-reported psychotropic drug prescribing practices of eating disorder psychiatrists for the treatment of young people with anorexia nervosa
Authors
KeywordsChild & adolescent psychiatry
Eating disorders
EPIDEMIOLOGY
Issue Date2019
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group: BMJ Open. The Journal's web site is located at http://bmjopen.bmj.com
Citation
BMJ Open, 2019, v. 9, p. e031707 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To survey current prescribing practices of psychotropic drugs by child and adolescent eating disorder (CAED) psychiatrists in the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN). Design: Cross-sectional self-administered survey. Setting: All children and young people eating disorder services (CYP EDS) in England during a national training programme. Participants: 44 CAED psychiatrists practising in CYP EDS in England. Primary and secondary outcome measures: CAED psychiatrists completed a questionnaire regarding the pattern of psychopharmacological care in AN that they provide and the medication treatment pattern at their CYP EDS. Secondary outcome measures included the process of continuing pharmacotherapy from secondary care to primary care. Results: Of the 77 CYP EDS representing every team in England, 44 teams represented by a CAED psychiatrist responded, despite 13 having no psychiatrists in post at the time of the study (response rate 69%). Most (40%) respondents estimated that <10% of patients with AN were prescribed psychotropic medications. Olanzapine was reported as the most commonly prescribed medication for AN by 38% of the respondents, followed by fluoxetine (29%) and sertraline (10%). The most common minimum olanzapine initiation dose in this study was at 2.5 mg/day for a duration of 2–4 weeks, reaching a maximum dose of 5 mg/day. Most (68%) reviewed medications every week (30%) or every 2 weeks (38%). Over 50% of the respondents reported continuation of olanzapine prescribing within the CYP EDS teams. Conclusions: This nationally representative survey showed that despite a lack of evidence, psychotropic medications are commonly prescribed to a minority of patients, most frequently, olanzapine. Further evidence is needed on which patients may potentially benefit from pharmacotherapy as an adjunct to psychological interventions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278596
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.692
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.132
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBeykloo, MY-
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, D-
dc.contributor.authorSimic, M-
dc.contributor.authorBrauer, R-
dc.contributor.authorMills, E-
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICK-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:10:28Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:10:28Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationBMJ Open, 2019, v. 9, p. e031707-
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278596-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To survey current prescribing practices of psychotropic drugs by child and adolescent eating disorder (CAED) psychiatrists in the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN). Design: Cross-sectional self-administered survey. Setting: All children and young people eating disorder services (CYP EDS) in England during a national training programme. Participants: 44 CAED psychiatrists practising in CYP EDS in England. Primary and secondary outcome measures: CAED psychiatrists completed a questionnaire regarding the pattern of psychopharmacological care in AN that they provide and the medication treatment pattern at their CYP EDS. Secondary outcome measures included the process of continuing pharmacotherapy from secondary care to primary care. Results: Of the 77 CYP EDS representing every team in England, 44 teams represented by a CAED psychiatrist responded, despite 13 having no psychiatrists in post at the time of the study (response rate 69%). Most (40%) respondents estimated that <10% of patients with AN were prescribed psychotropic medications. Olanzapine was reported as the most commonly prescribed medication for AN by 38% of the respondents, followed by fluoxetine (29%) and sertraline (10%). The most common minimum olanzapine initiation dose in this study was at 2.5 mg/day for a duration of 2–4 weeks, reaching a maximum dose of 5 mg/day. Most (68%) reviewed medications every week (30%) or every 2 weeks (38%). Over 50% of the respondents reported continuation of olanzapine prescribing within the CYP EDS teams. Conclusions: This nationally representative survey showed that despite a lack of evidence, psychotropic medications are commonly prescribed to a minority of patients, most frequently, olanzapine. Further evidence is needed on which patients may potentially benefit from pharmacotherapy as an adjunct to psychological interventions.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group: BMJ Open. The Journal's web site is located at http://bmjopen.bmj.com-
dc.relation.ispartofBMJ Open-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectChild & adolescent psychiatry-
dc.subjectEating disorders-
dc.subjectEPIDEMIOLOGY-
dc.titleSurvey on self-reported psychotropic drug prescribing practices of eating disorder psychiatrists for the treatment of young people with anorexia nervosa-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031707-
dc.identifier.pmid31542765-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6756572-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85072580649-
dc.identifier.hkuros308241-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.spagee031707-
dc.identifier.epagee031707-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000497787600390-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl2044-6055-

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