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Article: Dietary changes adopted by Chinese colorectal cancer patients: A qualitative study

TitleDietary changes adopted by Chinese colorectal cancer patients: A qualitative study
Authors
Keywordscolorectal cancer
diet modification
nutrition
survivorship
Issue Date2019
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/13652354
Citation
European Journal of Cancer Care, 2019, v. 28 n. 6, p. article no. e13159 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To explore influences on post‐diagnosis dietary decision‐making in colorectal cancer survivors (CRC) for future intervention development. Methods: Individual semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 30 CRC survivors. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim for grounded theory analysis. Results: Most CRC survivors interviewed reported making both short‐ and long‐term changes post‐diagnosis, influenced by physical symptoms and personal beliefs: short‐term treatment‐driven changes to facilitate recovery, manage treatment side‐effects and avoid disruption in treatment; short‐term ‘patient role’ driven changes heavily influenced by family members and cultural beliefs; long‐term changes driven by residual symptoms and illness beliefs, including cancer causal attributions and beliefs about preventing future recurrences. Traditional Chinese medicinal (TCM) beliefs were influential in both short‐ and long‐term dietary decision‐making, which may explain why survivors focused on specific food items rather than food patterns. Conclusion: While our findings suggested that the majority of CRC survivors made dietary changes post‐diagnosis, their dietary pattern and motivation may change over the course of their illness trajectory. Also, the types of changes made are often not consistent with existing dietary recommendations. It is necessary to consider illness perception and cultural beliefs when delivering dietary care or developing interventions for this population.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277987
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.161
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.819

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, JWC-
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWT-
dc.contributor.authorMa, ASY-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WL-
dc.contributor.authorWei, R-
dc.contributor.authorFielding, R-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-04T08:05:14Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-04T08:05:14Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Cancer Care, 2019, v. 28 n. 6, p. article no. e13159-
dc.identifier.issn0961-5423-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277987-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To explore influences on post‐diagnosis dietary decision‐making in colorectal cancer survivors (CRC) for future intervention development. Methods: Individual semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 30 CRC survivors. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim for grounded theory analysis. Results: Most CRC survivors interviewed reported making both short‐ and long‐term changes post‐diagnosis, influenced by physical symptoms and personal beliefs: short‐term treatment‐driven changes to facilitate recovery, manage treatment side‐effects and avoid disruption in treatment; short‐term ‘patient role’ driven changes heavily influenced by family members and cultural beliefs; long‐term changes driven by residual symptoms and illness beliefs, including cancer causal attributions and beliefs about preventing future recurrences. Traditional Chinese medicinal (TCM) beliefs were influential in both short‐ and long‐term dietary decision‐making, which may explain why survivors focused on specific food items rather than food patterns. Conclusion: While our findings suggested that the majority of CRC survivors made dietary changes post‐diagnosis, their dietary pattern and motivation may change over the course of their illness trajectory. Also, the types of changes made are often not consistent with existing dietary recommendations. It is necessary to consider illness perception and cultural beliefs when delivering dietary care or developing interventions for this population.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/13652354-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Cancer Care-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectcolorectal cancer-
dc.subjectdiet modification-
dc.subjectnutrition-
dc.subjectsurvivorship-
dc.titleDietary changes adopted by Chinese colorectal cancer patients: A qualitative study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTang, JWC: julia5@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLaw, WL: lawwl@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWei, R: rwei@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443-
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, WL=rp00436-
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ecc.13159-
dc.identifier.pmid31469202-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85071386039-
dc.identifier.hkuros306674-
dc.identifier.volume28-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e13159-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e13159-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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