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Article: Self-concept clarity lays the foundation for self-continuity: The restorative function of autobiographical memory

TitleSelf-concept clarity lays the foundation for self-continuity: The restorative function of autobiographical memory
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/psp.html
Citation
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2019, Epub How to Cite?
AbstractIn the article, the first phrase of the second sentence of Study 1 should appear as “This study begins to test H1”. The third sentence of the Participants and design section of Study 5 should read as follows: We excluded seven participants for not completing the study, and 13 for not following instructions (on participant in the autobiographical memory condition wrote: “Future of the country,” “Childrens future,” “Economy,” “Finances,” “Finding a job I enjoy,” “Health,” “Comfort,” “I would talk about my travels,” “My experience with family issues”). In the Manipulation check section of Study 6 and Study 7, participants instead reported lower self-concept clarity. In the third sentence in the second paragraph of the Low self-concept clarity, autobiographical memory, and self-continuity section of Study 6, the first instance of the word participants should be deleted. The third sentence of the Procedure and material section of Study 7 should read as follows: “in the control condition, they wrote in favor of environmental protection.” Additional corrections are provided in the erratum. All versions of this article have been corrected.] The current research concerns the relations among self-concept clarity, autobiographic memory, and self-continuity. We hypothesized, and tested in 7 studies, that low self-concept clarity would disrupt self-continuity, but resorting to autobiographic memory would counter this disruption, thus restoring self-continuity. In Studies 1 and 2, low or threatened self-concept clarity was associated with decreased, or led to a decrease of, self-continuity. In Study 3, participants low (vs. high) in self-concept clarity manifested a stronger preference for an autobiographical memory task (but not for a control task). In Study 4, a suppressed mediational model of autobiographical memory received empirical backing: Threatened self-concept clarity decreased self-continuity, but also increased the propensity to evoke autobiographical memory, which fostered self-continuity. By manipulating autobiographical memory in different ways, Studies 5 through 7 provided additional direct evidence for the capacity of autobiographical memory to restore self-continuity. Taken together, the results converge in support of the hypothesis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/276284
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 5.733
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.040
Errata

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJiang, T-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Z-
dc.contributor.authorSedikides, C-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:59:48Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:59:48Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2019, Epub-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3514-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/276284-
dc.description.abstractIn the article, the first phrase of the second sentence of Study 1 should appear as “This study begins to test H1”. The third sentence of the Participants and design section of Study 5 should read as follows: We excluded seven participants for not completing the study, and 13 for not following instructions (on participant in the autobiographical memory condition wrote: “Future of the country,” “Childrens future,” “Economy,” “Finances,” “Finding a job I enjoy,” “Health,” “Comfort,” “I would talk about my travels,” “My experience with family issues”). In the Manipulation check section of Study 6 and Study 7, participants instead reported lower self-concept clarity. In the third sentence in the second paragraph of the Low self-concept clarity, autobiographical memory, and self-continuity section of Study 6, the first instance of the word participants should be deleted. The third sentence of the Procedure and material section of Study 7 should read as follows: “in the control condition, they wrote in favor of environmental protection.” Additional corrections are provided in the erratum. All versions of this article have been corrected.] The current research concerns the relations among self-concept clarity, autobiographic memory, and self-continuity. We hypothesized, and tested in 7 studies, that low self-concept clarity would disrupt self-continuity, but resorting to autobiographic memory would counter this disruption, thus restoring self-continuity. In Studies 1 and 2, low or threatened self-concept clarity was associated with decreased, or led to a decrease of, self-continuity. In Study 3, participants low (vs. high) in self-concept clarity manifested a stronger preference for an autobiographical memory task (but not for a control task). In Study 4, a suppressed mediational model of autobiographical memory received empirical backing: Threatened self-concept clarity decreased self-continuity, but also increased the propensity to evoke autobiographical memory, which fostered self-continuity. By manipulating autobiographical memory in different ways, Studies 5 through 7 provided additional direct evidence for the capacity of autobiographical memory to restore self-continuity. Taken together, the results converge in support of the hypothesis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/psp.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Personality and Social Psychology-
dc.rightsJournal of Personality and Social Psychology. Copyright © American Psychological Association.-
dc.rightsThis article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.-
dc.titleSelf-concept clarity lays the foundation for self-continuity: The restorative function of autobiographical memory-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChen, Z: chenz@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, Z=rp00629-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/pspp0000259-
dc.identifier.hkuros304867-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.relation.erratumdoi:10.1037/pspp0000267-

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