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Article: Acculturative stress, disability, and health treatment utilization among Asian and Latin American immigrants in the United States

TitleAcculturative stress, disability, and health treatment utilization among Asian and Latin American immigrants in the United States
Authors
KeywordsMigration
Disability
Treatment
Acculturative stress
Discrimination
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127
Citation
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2019, v. 54 n. 10, p. 1275-1284 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Empirical research has largely ignored the potential links between immigration-related stress and disability as well as immigration-related stress and health service utilization despite increasing scholarship on the association between acculturative stress and health. This study examined the associations between acculturative stress, disability, and health treatment utilization among Asian and Latin American immigrants in the United States. Methods: Data were from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS), a nationally representative survey of Asians and Latinos living in the United States. The analytic sample contained 2653 immigrants. We utilized multivariable logistic regression and negative binomial regression analyses to examine the associations between acculturative stress and disability domains. We also examined the association between acculturative stress and treatment utilization, as this may have implications for how to best intervene to address any functional disability related to acculturative stress. Results: Acculturative stress was significantly associated with self-reported disability across five domains: self-care, cognition, mobility, time out of role, and social interaction. Additionally, acculturative stress was significantly associated with a greater frequency of disability domains. Acculturative stress was not significantly associated with utilization of services from mental health or general health sectors, but was significantly and positively associated with utilization of non-health care services. The findings were robust regarding the inclusion of everyday discrimination as well as demographic and socioeconomic covariates. Conclusions: Acculturative stress may be an important yet overlooked correlate of disability among immigrants in the United States. Non-health care services may provide an effective pathway for intervening for these individuals.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275158
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.328
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.863
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWaldman, K-
dc.contributor.authorKoyanagi, A-
dc.contributor.authorWang, JSH-
dc.contributor.authorKo, J-
dc.contributor.authorDeVylder, J-
dc.contributor.authorOh, H-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:36:44Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:36:44Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2019, v. 54 n. 10, p. 1275-1284-
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275158-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Empirical research has largely ignored the potential links between immigration-related stress and disability as well as immigration-related stress and health service utilization despite increasing scholarship on the association between acculturative stress and health. This study examined the associations between acculturative stress, disability, and health treatment utilization among Asian and Latin American immigrants in the United States. Methods: Data were from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS), a nationally representative survey of Asians and Latinos living in the United States. The analytic sample contained 2653 immigrants. We utilized multivariable logistic regression and negative binomial regression analyses to examine the associations between acculturative stress and disability domains. We also examined the association between acculturative stress and treatment utilization, as this may have implications for how to best intervene to address any functional disability related to acculturative stress. Results: Acculturative stress was significantly associated with self-reported disability across five domains: self-care, cognition, mobility, time out of role, and social interaction. Additionally, acculturative stress was significantly associated with a greater frequency of disability domains. Acculturative stress was not significantly associated with utilization of services from mental health or general health sectors, but was significantly and positively associated with utilization of non-health care services. The findings were robust regarding the inclusion of everyday discrimination as well as demographic and socioeconomic covariates. Conclusions: Acculturative stress may be an important yet overlooked correlate of disability among immigrants in the United States. Non-health care services may provide an effective pathway for intervening for these individuals.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127-
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [insert journal title]. The final authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectMigration-
dc.subjectDisability-
dc.subjectTreatment-
dc.subjectAcculturative stress-
dc.subjectDiscrimination-
dc.titleAcculturative stress, disability, and health treatment utilization among Asian and Latin American immigrants in the United States-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWang, JSH: jshwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, JSH=rp02181-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-019-01691-0-
dc.identifier.pmid30895354-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85063230421-
dc.identifier.hkuros305012-
dc.identifier.volume54-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage1275-
dc.identifier.epage1284-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000491562200011-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-
dc.identifier.issnl0933-7954-

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