File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A Comparative, Multi-national Analysis of the Quality of Life and Learning Factors of Medical and Non-medical Undergraduate Students

TitleA Comparative, Multi-national Analysis of the Quality of Life and Learning Factors of Medical and Non-medical Undergraduate Students
Authors
KeywordsMedical and biomedical students
Social science students
Quality of life
Motivation beliefs
Competitiveness
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/journal/40670
Citation
Medical Science Educator, 2019, v. 29 n. 2, p. 475-487 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: This study compares data from two medical student cohorts early in their training from New Zealand and Hong Kong and then makes further comparisons with a non-medical group. Methods: Questionnaires obtained information regarding educational site (universities situated in New Zealand, Hong Kong, and USA), gender, age, motivational beliefs, quality of life, and competitiveness. The study was split into two phases. The first phase focused on measuring and comparing the learning and wellbeing variables of two medical student cohorts. The second phase focussed on making further comparisons with non-medical student groups. Results: Responses were elicited from 353 students in medically oriented courses and 688 students with a non-medical orientation. For phase 1, the results indicated differences between the two medical student groups on measures of self-efficacy, intrinsic value, enjoyment of competition, and physical quality of life. For phase 2, differences between the medical and non-medical student groups were noted for self-efficacy, intrinsic value, enjoyment of competition, contentiousness, and physical and social quality of life. Conclusions: The results provide insights into medical and non-medical students’ learning and wellbeing experiences from multi-national, multi-discipline perspectives. The results suggest that wellbeing issues of students are likely context-specific and moderated by region, curriculum, gender, and culture.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275070
ISSN
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.257

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHenning, MA-
dc.contributor.authorChen, JY-
dc.contributor.authorKrageloh, CU-
dc.contributor.authorHill, EM-
dc.contributor.authorBooth, R-
dc.contributor.authorWebster, C-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:34:48Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:34:48Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationMedical Science Educator, 2019, v. 29 n. 2, p. 475-487-
dc.identifier.issn2156-8650-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275070-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study compares data from two medical student cohorts early in their training from New Zealand and Hong Kong and then makes further comparisons with a non-medical group. Methods: Questionnaires obtained information regarding educational site (universities situated in New Zealand, Hong Kong, and USA), gender, age, motivational beliefs, quality of life, and competitiveness. The study was split into two phases. The first phase focused on measuring and comparing the learning and wellbeing variables of two medical student cohorts. The second phase focussed on making further comparisons with non-medical student groups. Results: Responses were elicited from 353 students in medically oriented courses and 688 students with a non-medical orientation. For phase 1, the results indicated differences between the two medical student groups on measures of self-efficacy, intrinsic value, enjoyment of competition, and physical quality of life. For phase 2, differences between the medical and non-medical student groups were noted for self-efficacy, intrinsic value, enjoyment of competition, contentiousness, and physical and social quality of life. Conclusions: The results provide insights into medical and non-medical students’ learning and wellbeing experiences from multi-national, multi-discipline perspectives. The results suggest that wellbeing issues of students are likely context-specific and moderated by region, curriculum, gender, and culture.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/journal/40670-
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Science Educator-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [insert journal title]. The final authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectMedical and biomedical students-
dc.subjectSocial science students-
dc.subjectQuality of life-
dc.subjectMotivation beliefs-
dc.subjectCompetitiveness-
dc.titleA Comparative, Multi-national Analysis of the Quality of Life and Learning Factors of Medical and Non-medical Undergraduate Students-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChen, JY: juliechen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, JY=rp00526-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40670-019-00716-2-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85071656689-
dc.identifier.hkuros303523-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage475-
dc.identifier.epage487-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-
dc.identifier.issnl2156-8650-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats