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Article: Longterm Data on Sirolimus Treatment in Patients with Lupus Nephritis

TitleLongterm Data on Sirolimus Treatment in Patients with Lupus Nephritis
Authors
KeywordsSIROLIMUS
MALIGNANCY
LUPUS NEPHRITIS
LONGTERM TREATMENT
Issue Date2018
PublisherJournal of Rheumatology Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jrheum.com
Citation
Journal of Rheumatology, 2018, v. 45 n. 12, p. 1663-1670 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. To expand the limited longterm data on sirolimus treatment in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Our pilot short-term data suggested efficacy of sirolimus treatment in these patients. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 16 class III/IV/V patients with LN who have received prednisolone (PSL) and sirolimus either as initial or maintenance treatment. Results. Sixteen patients received sirolimus treatment (9 because of intolerance to standard immunosuppressants and 7 because of a history of malignancy) for 45.3 ± 36.5 months. In 5 patients, sirolimus and PSL were given as induction for active nephritis, and they showed improvements in proteinuria (2.8 ± 1.9 g/day at baseline, 0.1 ± 0.1 g/day after 36 mos, p = 0.011), anti-dsDNA (107.7 ± 91.9 IU/ml and 37.0 ± 55.4 IU/ml, respectively, p = 0.178), and C3 (54.8 ± 26.1 mg/dl and 86.3 ± 18.6 mg/dl, respectively, p = 0.081). Eleven patients received sirolimus and low-dose PSL as longterm maintenance, and they showed continued improvement in C3 (90.4 ± 18.1 mg/dl and 117.7 ± 25.1 mg/dl at commencement and after 36 mos, respectively, p = 0.025), stable renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate 58.6 ± 25.8 ml/min and 63.0 ± 29.6 ml/min, respectively, p = 0.239), and proteinuria (0.8 ± 0.7 g/day and 0.7 ± 0.7 g/day respectively, p = 0.252). Renal flare occurred in 1 patient, and another patient who had stage 4 chronic kidney disease when sirolimus was started developed endstage renal failure after 27 months. Sirolimus was discontinued in 5 patients, in 4 cases related to drug side effects. Deterioration of dyslipidemia occurred in 4 patients, but was adequately controlled with statin therapy. Conclusion. The preliminary evidence suggests that sirolimus may serve as an alternative treatment for patients with LN who do not tolerate standard treatment or who had a history of malignancy, and it has an acceptable longterm safety profile.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273404
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.666
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.225
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYap, DYH-
dc.contributor.authorTang, C-
dc.contributor.authorChan, GCW-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, LPY-
dc.contributor.authorMa, MKM-
dc.contributor.authorMok, MY-
dc.contributor.authorChan, TM-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T09:28:20Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-06T09:28:20Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Rheumatology, 2018, v. 45 n. 12, p. 1663-1670-
dc.identifier.issn0315-162X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273404-
dc.description.abstractObjective. To expand the limited longterm data on sirolimus treatment in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Our pilot short-term data suggested efficacy of sirolimus treatment in these patients. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 16 class III/IV/V patients with LN who have received prednisolone (PSL) and sirolimus either as initial or maintenance treatment. Results. Sixteen patients received sirolimus treatment (9 because of intolerance to standard immunosuppressants and 7 because of a history of malignancy) for 45.3 ± 36.5 months. In 5 patients, sirolimus and PSL were given as induction for active nephritis, and they showed improvements in proteinuria (2.8 ± 1.9 g/day at baseline, 0.1 ± 0.1 g/day after 36 mos, p = 0.011), anti-dsDNA (107.7 ± 91.9 IU/ml and 37.0 ± 55.4 IU/ml, respectively, p = 0.178), and C3 (54.8 ± 26.1 mg/dl and 86.3 ± 18.6 mg/dl, respectively, p = 0.081). Eleven patients received sirolimus and low-dose PSL as longterm maintenance, and they showed continued improvement in C3 (90.4 ± 18.1 mg/dl and 117.7 ± 25.1 mg/dl at commencement and after 36 mos, respectively, p = 0.025), stable renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate 58.6 ± 25.8 ml/min and 63.0 ± 29.6 ml/min, respectively, p = 0.239), and proteinuria (0.8 ± 0.7 g/day and 0.7 ± 0.7 g/day respectively, p = 0.252). Renal flare occurred in 1 patient, and another patient who had stage 4 chronic kidney disease when sirolimus was started developed endstage renal failure after 27 months. Sirolimus was discontinued in 5 patients, in 4 cases related to drug side effects. Deterioration of dyslipidemia occurred in 4 patients, but was adequately controlled with statin therapy. Conclusion. The preliminary evidence suggests that sirolimus may serve as an alternative treatment for patients with LN who do not tolerate standard treatment or who had a history of malignancy, and it has an acceptable longterm safety profile.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJournal of Rheumatology Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jrheum.com-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Rheumatology-
dc.rightsIf funding agency rules apply, authors may deposit in institutional, or centrally organised repositories including PubMed Central for public release 12 months after first online publication. Published source must be acknowledged with set statement ('This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The Journal of Rheumatology following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL for the fully published article here]')-
dc.subjectSIROLIMUS-
dc.subjectMALIGNANCY-
dc.subjectLUPUS NEPHRITIS-
dc.subjectLONGTERM TREATMENT-
dc.titleLongterm Data on Sirolimus Treatment in Patients with Lupus Nephritis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYap, DYH: desmondy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTang, C: csotang@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, GCW: gcwchan1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKwan, LPY: kpy472@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMa, MKM: h9914584@graduate.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMok, MY: mmymok@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, TM: dtmchan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYap, DYH=rp01607-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, TM=rp00394-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3899/jrheum.180507-
dc.identifier.pmid30275264-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85057724402-
dc.identifier.hkuros300443-
dc.identifier.volume45-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage1663-
dc.identifier.epage1670-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000451809300011-
dc.publisher.placeCanada-
dc.identifier.issnl0315-162X-

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