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Article: Avian influenza A H7N9 virus infects human astrocytes and neuronal cells and induces inflammatory immune responses

TitleAvian influenza A H7N9 virus infects human astrocytes and neuronal cells and induces inflammatory immune responses
Authors
KeywordsCytokines
Encephalitis
Encephalopathy
Neurodegenerative diseases
Neuroinflammation
Neurological complications
Issue Date2018
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/biomed/neuroscience/journal/13365
Citation
Journal of NeuroVirology, 2018, v. 24 n. 6, p. 752-760 How to Cite?
AbstractSeasonal, pandemic, and avian influenza virus infections may be associated with central nervous system pathology, albeit with varying frequency and different mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that differentiated human astrocytic (T98G) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells can be infected by avian H7N9 and pandemic H1N1 viruses. However, infectious progeny viruses can only be detected in H7N9 virus infected human neuronal cells. Neither of these viral strains can generate infectious progeny virus in human astrocytes despite replication of viral genome was observed. Furthermore, H7N9 virus triggered high pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, while pandemic H1N1 virus induced only low cytokine expression in either brain cell type. The experimental finding here is the first data to demonstrate that avian H7N9 virus can infect, transcribe, and replicate its viral genome; induce cytokine upregulation; and cause cytopathic effects in human brain cells, which may potentially lead to profound central nervous system injury. Observation for neurological problems due to H7N9 virus infection deserves further attention when managing these patients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268256
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.354
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.979
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, YP-
dc.contributor.authorYip, TF-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorIp, NY-
dc.contributor.authorLee, MY-
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-18T04:21:50Z-
dc.date.available2019-03-18T04:21:50Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of NeuroVirology, 2018, v. 24 n. 6, p. 752-760-
dc.identifier.issn1355-0284-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268256-
dc.description.abstractSeasonal, pandemic, and avian influenza virus infections may be associated with central nervous system pathology, albeit with varying frequency and different mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that differentiated human astrocytic (T98G) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells can be infected by avian H7N9 and pandemic H1N1 viruses. However, infectious progeny viruses can only be detected in H7N9 virus infected human neuronal cells. Neither of these viral strains can generate infectious progeny virus in human astrocytes despite replication of viral genome was observed. Furthermore, H7N9 virus triggered high pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, while pandemic H1N1 virus induced only low cytokine expression in either brain cell type. The experimental finding here is the first data to demonstrate that avian H7N9 virus can infect, transcribe, and replicate its viral genome; induce cytokine upregulation; and cause cytopathic effects in human brain cells, which may potentially lead to profound central nervous system injury. Observation for neurological problems due to H7N9 virus infection deserves further attention when managing these patients.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/biomed/neuroscience/journal/13365-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of NeuroVirology-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectCytokines-
dc.subjectEncephalitis-
dc.subjectEncephalopathy-
dc.subjectNeurodegenerative diseases-
dc.subjectNeuroinflammation-
dc.subjectNeurological complications-
dc.titleAvian influenza A H7N9 virus infects human astrocytes and neuronal cells and induces inflammatory immune responses-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYip, TF: yiptf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, MY: suki@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, MY=rp01536-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13365-018-0659-8-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85049649721-
dc.identifier.hkuros297091-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage752-
dc.identifier.epage760-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000452064200010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl1355-0284-

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