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Article: Effects of mantle rheologies on viscous heating induced by Glacial Isostatic Adjustment

TitleEffects of mantle rheologies on viscous heating induced by Glacial Isostatic Adjustment
Authors
KeywordsLoading of the Earth
Europe
North America
Heat generation and transport
Rheology: mantle
Issue Date2018
PublisherOxford University Press, published in association with Royal Astronomical Society. The Journal's web site is located at https://academic.oup.com/gji/
Citation
Geophysical Journal International, 2018, v. 213 n. 1, p. 157-168 How to Cite?
AbstractIt has been argued that viscous dissipation from mantle flow in response to surface loading during glacial cycles can result in short-term heating and thus trigger transient volcanism or changes in mantle properties, which may in turn affect mantle dynamics. Furthermore, heating near the Earth's surface can also affect the stability of ice sheets. We have studied the magnitude and spatial-temporal distribution of viscous heating induced in the mantle by the realistic ice model ICE-6G and gravitationally consistent ocean loads. Three types of mantle rheologies, including linear, non-linear and composite rheologies are considered to see if non-linear creep can induce larger viscous heating than linear rheology. We used the Coupled-Laplace-Finite-Element model of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) to compute the strain, stress and shear heating during a glacial cycle. We also investigated the upper bound of temperature change and surface heat flux change due to viscous heating. We found that maximum viscous heating occurs near the end of deglaciation near the edge of the ice sheet with amplitude as high as 120 times larger than that of the chondritic radioactive heating. The maximum heat flux due to viscous heating can reach 30 mW m−2, but the area with large heat flux is small and the timescale of heating is short. As a result, the upper bound of temperature change due to viscous heating is small. Even if 30 glacial cycles are included, the largest temperature change can be of the order of 0.3 °C. Thus, viscous heating induced by GIA cannot induce volcanism and cannot significantly affect mantle material properties, mantle dynamics nor ice-sheet stability.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266008
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.934
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.839
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, P-
dc.contributor.authorWu, PPC-
dc.contributor.authorvan der Wal, W-
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-17T02:16:31Z-
dc.date.available2018-12-17T02:16:31Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationGeophysical Journal International, 2018, v. 213 n. 1, p. 157-168-
dc.identifier.issn0956-540X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266008-
dc.description.abstractIt has been argued that viscous dissipation from mantle flow in response to surface loading during glacial cycles can result in short-term heating and thus trigger transient volcanism or changes in mantle properties, which may in turn affect mantle dynamics. Furthermore, heating near the Earth's surface can also affect the stability of ice sheets. We have studied the magnitude and spatial-temporal distribution of viscous heating induced in the mantle by the realistic ice model ICE-6G and gravitationally consistent ocean loads. Three types of mantle rheologies, including linear, non-linear and composite rheologies are considered to see if non-linear creep can induce larger viscous heating than linear rheology. We used the Coupled-Laplace-Finite-Element model of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) to compute the strain, stress and shear heating during a glacial cycle. We also investigated the upper bound of temperature change and surface heat flux change due to viscous heating. We found that maximum viscous heating occurs near the end of deglaciation near the edge of the ice sheet with amplitude as high as 120 times larger than that of the chondritic radioactive heating. The maximum heat flux due to viscous heating can reach 30 mW m−2, but the area with large heat flux is small and the timescale of heating is short. As a result, the upper bound of temperature change due to viscous heating is small. Even if 30 glacial cycles are included, the largest temperature change can be of the order of 0.3 °C. Thus, viscous heating induced by GIA cannot induce volcanism and cannot significantly affect mantle material properties, mantle dynamics nor ice-sheet stability.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press, published in association with Royal Astronomical Society. The Journal's web site is located at https://academic.oup.com/gji/-
dc.relation.ispartofGeophysical Journal International-
dc.rightsThis article has been accepted for publication in Geophysical Journal International © 2017 The Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.-
dc.subjectLoading of the Earth-
dc.subjectEurope-
dc.subjectNorth America-
dc.subjectHeat generation and transport-
dc.subjectRheology: mantle-
dc.titleEffects of mantle rheologies on viscous heating induced by Glacial Isostatic Adjustment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWu, PPC: ppwu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWu, PPC=rp01830-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/gji/ggx535-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85041809281-
dc.identifier.hkuros296315-
dc.identifier.volume213-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage157-
dc.identifier.epage168-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000448715000011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0956-540X-

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