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Article: Functional anatomy of a giant toothless mandible from a bird-like dinosaur: Gigantoraptor and the evolution of the oviraptorosaurian jaw

TitleFunctional anatomy of a giant toothless mandible from a bird-like dinosaur: Gigantoraptor and the evolution of the oviraptorosaurian jaw
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherNature Publishing Group: Open Access Journals - Option C. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2017, v. 7 n. 1, p. Article no. 15709 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Oviraptorosauria are a group of theropod dinosaurs that diverged from the typical carnivorous theropod diet. It includes two main lineages - Caenagnathidae and Oviraptoridae - that display a number of differences in mandibular morphology, but little is known about their functional consequences, hampering our understanding of oviraptorosaurian dietary evolution. This study presents the first in-depth description of the giant toothless mandible of Gigantoraptor, the only well-preserved stemward caenagnathid mandible. This mandible shows the greatest relative beak depth among caenagnathids, which is an adaptation seen in some modern birds for processing harder seeds. The presence of a lingual triturating shelf in caenagnathids more crownward than Gigantoraptor suggests a possible increased specialization towards shearing along this lineage. Like other oviraptorosaurs, the possession of a dorsally convex articular glenoid in Gigantoraptor indicates that propalinal jaw movement was probably an important mechanism for food processing, as in Sphenodon and dicynodonts. Oviraptorid mandibles were more suited for producing powerful bites (e.g. crushing-related) compared to caenagnathids: oviraptorids generally possess a deeper, more downturned beak, a taller coronoid process prominence and a larger medial mandibular fossa. This disparity in caenagnathid and oviraptorid mandible morphology potentially suggests specialization towards two different feeding styles - shearing and crushing-related mechanisms respectively. © 2017 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/264121
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.998
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMa, WS-
dc.contributor.authorWang, JY-
dc.contributor.authorPittman, MD-
dc.contributor.authorTan, QW-
dc.contributor.authorTan, L-
dc.contributor.authorGuo, B-
dc.contributor.authorXu, X-
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-22T07:49:54Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-22T07:49:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2017, v. 7 n. 1, p. Article no. 15709-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/264121-
dc.description.abstractThe Oviraptorosauria are a group of theropod dinosaurs that diverged from the typical carnivorous theropod diet. It includes two main lineages - Caenagnathidae and Oviraptoridae - that display a number of differences in mandibular morphology, but little is known about their functional consequences, hampering our understanding of oviraptorosaurian dietary evolution. This study presents the first in-depth description of the giant toothless mandible of Gigantoraptor, the only well-preserved stemward caenagnathid mandible. This mandible shows the greatest relative beak depth among caenagnathids, which is an adaptation seen in some modern birds for processing harder seeds. The presence of a lingual triturating shelf in caenagnathids more crownward than Gigantoraptor suggests a possible increased specialization towards shearing along this lineage. Like other oviraptorosaurs, the possession of a dorsally convex articular glenoid in Gigantoraptor indicates that propalinal jaw movement was probably an important mechanism for food processing, as in Sphenodon and dicynodonts. Oviraptorid mandibles were more suited for producing powerful bites (e.g. crushing-related) compared to caenagnathids: oviraptorids generally possess a deeper, more downturned beak, a taller coronoid process prominence and a larger medial mandibular fossa. This disparity in caenagnathid and oviraptorid mandible morphology potentially suggests specialization towards two different feeding styles - shearing and crushing-related mechanisms respectively. © 2017 The Author(s).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group: Open Access Journals - Option C. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleFunctional anatomy of a giant toothless mandible from a bird-like dinosaur: Gigantoraptor and the evolution of the oviraptorosaurian jaw-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailPittman, MD: mpittman@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPittman, MD=rp01622-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-15709-7-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85035044186-
dc.identifier.hkuros295503-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spageArticle no. 15709-
dc.identifier.epageArticle no. 15709-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000416135000046-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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