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Article: Facing death alone or together? Investigating the interdependence of death anxiety, dysfunctional attitudes, and quality of life in patient-caregiver dyads confronting lung cancer

TitleFacing death alone or together? Investigating the interdependence of death anxiety, dysfunctional attitudes, and quality of life in patient-caregiver dyads confronting lung cancer
Authors
KeywordsCancer
Caregiving
Death anxiety
Dyadic
Dysfunctional attitudes
Issue Date2018
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2018, v. 27 n. 8, p. 2045-2051 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Based on the cognitive theory, anxiety arising from the awareness of death and dying may activate dysfunctional attitudes, which may then reduce quality of life. This study examined the interdependence and the mediating role of dysfunctional attitudes on the relationship between death anxiety and quality of life among patients with lung cancer and their caregivers. Methods: From March 2016 to April 2017, 173 pairs of patients and their caregivers enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of psychosocial support. Using the baseline data, actor-partner interdependence modeling was used to analyze the relationships among death anxiety, dysfunctional attitudes, and quality of life. Results: In patients, death anxiety was related to dependency (β =.51) and self-control (β = −.37); achievement (β = −.21) and self-control (β =.34) were related to quality of life. Among caregivers, death anxiety was related to all 3 dysfunctional attitudes of their own (βs =.23 to.32); dependency (β = −.22) was associated with quality of life. Caregiver quality of life was also associated with patient self-control (β =.22) and achievement (β = −.18). Patient self-control mediated the links between patient death anxiety with both patient and caregiver quality of life. The relationship between death anxiety and quality of life was mediated by dependency in caregivers. Discussion: Death anxiety influences dysfunctional attitudes and quality of life of both patients and caregivers. Our results support the relevance of dysfunctional attitudes in understanding the impact of death anxiety and underscore the need for parallel psychosocial interventions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261872
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.006
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, HP-
dc.contributor.authorWong, FKD-
dc.contributor.authorFung, YL-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, J-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLW-
dc.contributor.authorChow, AYM-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-28T04:49:33Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-28T04:49:33Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2018, v. 27 n. 8, p. 2045-2051-
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261872-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Based on the cognitive theory, anxiety arising from the awareness of death and dying may activate dysfunctional attitudes, which may then reduce quality of life. This study examined the interdependence and the mediating role of dysfunctional attitudes on the relationship between death anxiety and quality of life among patients with lung cancer and their caregivers. Methods: From March 2016 to April 2017, 173 pairs of patients and their caregivers enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of psychosocial support. Using the baseline data, actor-partner interdependence modeling was used to analyze the relationships among death anxiety, dysfunctional attitudes, and quality of life. Results: In patients, death anxiety was related to dependency (β =.51) and self-control (β = −.37); achievement (β = −.21) and self-control (β =.34) were related to quality of life. Among caregivers, death anxiety was related to all 3 dysfunctional attitudes of their own (βs =.23 to.32); dependency (β = −.22) was associated with quality of life. Caregiver quality of life was also associated with patient self-control (β =.22) and achievement (β = −.18). Patient self-control mediated the links between patient death anxiety with both patient and caregiver quality of life. The relationship between death anxiety and quality of life was mediated by dependency in caregivers. Discussion: Death anxiety influences dysfunctional attitudes and quality of life of both patients and caregivers. Our results support the relevance of dysfunctional attitudes in understanding the impact of death anxiety and underscore the need for parallel psychosocial interventions.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncology-
dc.subjectCancer-
dc.subjectCaregiving-
dc.subjectDeath anxiety-
dc.subjectDyadic-
dc.subjectDysfunctional attitudes-
dc.titleFacing death alone or together? Investigating the interdependence of death anxiety, dysfunctional attitudes, and quality of life in patient-caregiver dyads confronting lung cancer-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLau, HP: hpbl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, FKD: dfkwong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChow, AYM: chowamy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, HP=rp02055-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, FKD=rp00593-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579-
dc.identifier.authorityChow, AYM=rp00623-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.4773-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85051215765-
dc.identifier.hkuros293010-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage2045-
dc.identifier.epage2051-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000440931500023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl1057-9249-

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