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Article: High thermal stress responses of Echinolittorina snails at their range edge predict population vulnerability to future warming

TitleHigh thermal stress responses of Echinolittorina snails at their range edge predict population vulnerability to future warming
Authors
KeywordsBiogeography
Distribution range
Global change
Heat shock response
Physiological stress
Issue Date2018
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2018, v. 647, p. 763-771 How to Cite?
AbstractPopulations at the edge of their species' distribution ranges are typically living at the physiological extreme of the environmental conditions they can tolerate. As a species' response to global change is likely to be largely determined by its physiological performance, subsequent changes in environmental conditions can profoundly influence populations at range edges, resulting in range extensions or retractions. To understand the differential physiological performance among populations at their distribution range edge and center, we measured levels of mRNA for heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as an indicator of temperature sensitivity in two high-shore littorinid snails, Echinolittorina malaccana and E. radiata, between 1°N to 36°N along the NW Pacific coast. These Echinolittorina snails are extremely heat-tolerant and frequently experience environmental temperatures in excess of 55 °C when emersed. It was assumed that animals exhibiting high temperature sensitivity will synthesize higher levels of mRNA, which will thus lead to higher energetic costs for thermal defense. Populations showed significant geographic variation in temperature sensitivity along their range. Snails at the northern range edge of E. malaccana and southern range edge of E. radiata exhibited higher levels of hsp70 expression than individuals collected from populations at the center of their respective ranges. The high levels of hsp70 mRNA in populations at the edge of a species' distribution range may serve as an adaptive response to locally stressful thermal environments, suggesting populations at the edge of their distribution range are potentially more
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259952
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 6.551
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.702

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHan, G-
dc.contributor.authorCartwright, SR-
dc.contributor.authorGanmanee, M-
dc.contributor.authorChan, BKK-
dc.contributor.authorAdzis, KAA-
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, N-
dc.contributor.authorWang, J-
dc.contributor.authorHui, TY-
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GA-
dc.contributor.authorDong, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-03T04:21:14Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-03T04:21:14Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationScience of the Total Environment, 2018, v. 647, p. 763-771-
dc.identifier.issn0048-9697-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259952-
dc.description.abstractPopulations at the edge of their species' distribution ranges are typically living at the physiological extreme of the environmental conditions they can tolerate. As a species' response to global change is likely to be largely determined by its physiological performance, subsequent changes in environmental conditions can profoundly influence populations at range edges, resulting in range extensions or retractions. To understand the differential physiological performance among populations at their distribution range edge and center, we measured levels of mRNA for heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as an indicator of temperature sensitivity in two high-shore littorinid snails, Echinolittorina malaccana and E. radiata, between 1°N to 36°N along the NW Pacific coast. These Echinolittorina snails are extremely heat-tolerant and frequently experience environmental temperatures in excess of 55 °C when emersed. It was assumed that animals exhibiting high temperature sensitivity will synthesize higher levels of mRNA, which will thus lead to higher energetic costs for thermal defense. Populations showed significant geographic variation in temperature sensitivity along their range. Snails at the northern range edge of E. malaccana and southern range edge of E. radiata exhibited higher levels of hsp70 expression than individuals collected from populations at the center of their respective ranges. The high levels of hsp70 mRNA in populations at the edge of a species' distribution range may serve as an adaptive response to locally stressful thermal environments, suggesting populations at the edge of their distribution range are potentially more-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv-
dc.relation.ispartofScience of the Total Environment-
dc.subjectBiogeography-
dc.subjectDistribution range-
dc.subjectGlobal change-
dc.subjectHeat shock response-
dc.subjectPhysiological stress-
dc.titleHigh thermal stress responses of Echinolittorina snails at their range edge predict population vulnerability to future warming-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHui, TY: hty13@connect.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.08.005-
dc.identifier.hkuros289718-
dc.identifier.volume647-
dc.identifier.spage763-
dc.identifier.epage771-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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