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Article: When secular universalism meets pluralism: religious schools and the politics of school-based management in Hong Kong

TitleWhen secular universalism meets pluralism: religious schools and the politics of school-based management in Hong Kong
Authors
Keywordscontingent neoliberalism
education
Hong Kong
religious school
school-based management
Issue Date2018
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/raag20/current
Citation
Annals of the American Association of Geographers, 2018, v. 108 n. 3, p. 794-810 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article examines the politics of school-based management (SBM) in Hong Kong, with a specific focus on the conflicts between the state and three Christian churches (Catholic, Anglican, and Methodist) running state-funded religious schools. Although the state based its advocacy for SBM on neoliberally driven ideas of participation, transparency, and accountability, religious groups expressed worry about the loss of control over schools as an institution of value transmission anchored in religious beliefs. This article uses the SBM controversy as a case study to advance geographical debates on religious schools and argues that neoliberalism forms a necessary lens through which to examine the state–religion relations concerning religious schools. It offers an analytical framework that emphasizes the mutually constitutive relationship between religious schools and state building. It lends evidence to this argument by situating religious schools in the context of neoliberalization of education policies and arguing that faith-based sensibilities create new vectors of resistance to neoliberalism as a distinctive secular formation. The empirical analyses address three questions. First, we develop a detailed analysis of the discourses and rationalities upheld by the Hong Kong government and the churches. Second, we consider interactions and exchanges between the state and the churches, focusing on the assertions, negotiations, and concessions that both needed to make in a prolonged struggle over the decision-making process. Third, we reflect briefly on the aftermath of the passing of SBM to situate the churches' concerns in a broader context of neoliberal education policy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259630
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.81
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.896
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQian, J-
dc.contributor.authorKong, L-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-03T04:11:10Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-03T04:11:10Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of the American Association of Geographers, 2018, v. 108 n. 3, p. 794-810-
dc.identifier.issn0004-5608-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259630-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the politics of school-based management (SBM) in Hong Kong, with a specific focus on the conflicts between the state and three Christian churches (Catholic, Anglican, and Methodist) running state-funded religious schools. Although the state based its advocacy for SBM on neoliberally driven ideas of participation, transparency, and accountability, religious groups expressed worry about the loss of control over schools as an institution of value transmission anchored in religious beliefs. This article uses the SBM controversy as a case study to advance geographical debates on religious schools and argues that neoliberalism forms a necessary lens through which to examine the state–religion relations concerning religious schools. It offers an analytical framework that emphasizes the mutually constitutive relationship between religious schools and state building. It lends evidence to this argument by situating religious schools in the context of neoliberalization of education policies and arguing that faith-based sensibilities create new vectors of resistance to neoliberalism as a distinctive secular formation. The empirical analyses address three questions. First, we develop a detailed analysis of the discourses and rationalities upheld by the Hong Kong government and the churches. Second, we consider interactions and exchanges between the state and the churches, focusing on the assertions, negotiations, and concessions that both needed to make in a prolonged struggle over the decision-making process. Third, we reflect briefly on the aftermath of the passing of SBM to situate the churches' concerns in a broader context of neoliberal education policy.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/raag20/current-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of the American Association of Geographers-
dc.rightsPreprint: This is an Author's Original Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/[Article DOI]. Postprint: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/[Article DOI]. -
dc.subjectcontingent neoliberalism-
dc.subjecteducation-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectreligious school-
dc.subjectschool-based management-
dc.titleWhen secular universalism meets pluralism: religious schools and the politics of school-based management in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailQian, J: jxqian@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityQian, J=rp02246-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/24694452.2017.1372175-
dc.identifier.hkuros289754-
dc.identifier.volume108-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage794-
dc.identifier.epage810-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000428672900011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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