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Article: Family Communication in Inherited Cardiovascular Conditions in Ireland

TitleFamily Communication in Inherited Cardiovascular Conditions in Ireland
Authors
KeywordsCommunication
Family
Genetics
Inherited cardiac conditions
Issue Date2016
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1059-7700
Citation
Journal of Genetic Counseling, 2016, v. 25 n. 6, p. 1317-1326 How to Cite?
AbstractOver 100,000 individuals living in Ireland carry a mutated gene for an inherited cardiac condition (ICC), most of which demonstrate an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. First-degree relatives of individuals with these mutations are at a 50 % risk of being a carrier: disclosing genetic information to family members can be complex. This study explored how families living in Ireland communicate genetic information about ICCs and looked at the challenges of communicating information, factors that may affect communication and what influence this had on family relationships. Face to face interviews were conducted with nine participants using an approved topic guide and results analysed using thematic analysis. The participants disclosed that responsibility to future generations, gender, proximity and lack of contact all played a role in family communication. The media was cited as a source of information about genetic information and knowledge of genetic information tended to have a positive effect on families. Results from this study indicate that individuals are willing to inform family members, particularly when there are children and grandchildren at risk, and different strategies are utilised. Furthermore, understanding of genetics is partially regulated not only by their families, but by the way society handles information. Therefore, genetic health professionals should take into account the familial influence on individuals and their decision to attend genetic services, and also that of the media.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/246917
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.537
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.867
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWhyte, S-
dc.contributor.authorGreen, A-
dc.contributor.authorMcAllister, M-
dc.contributor.authorShipman, HE-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:19:22Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:19:22Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Genetic Counseling, 2016, v. 25 n. 6, p. 1317-1326-
dc.identifier.issn1059-7700-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/246917-
dc.description.abstractOver 100,000 individuals living in Ireland carry a mutated gene for an inherited cardiac condition (ICC), most of which demonstrate an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. First-degree relatives of individuals with these mutations are at a 50 % risk of being a carrier: disclosing genetic information to family members can be complex. This study explored how families living in Ireland communicate genetic information about ICCs and looked at the challenges of communicating information, factors that may affect communication and what influence this had on family relationships. Face to face interviews were conducted with nine participants using an approved topic guide and results analysed using thematic analysis. The participants disclosed that responsibility to future generations, gender, proximity and lack of contact all played a role in family communication. The media was cited as a source of information about genetic information and knowledge of genetic information tended to have a positive effect on families. Results from this study indicate that individuals are willing to inform family members, particularly when there are children and grandchildren at risk, and different strategies are utilised. Furthermore, understanding of genetics is partially regulated not only by their families, but by the way society handles information. Therefore, genetic health professionals should take into account the familial influence on individuals and their decision to attend genetic services, and also that of the media.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1059-7700-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Genetic Counseling-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-016-9974-5-
dc.subjectCommunication-
dc.subjectFamily-
dc.subjectGenetics-
dc.subjectInherited cardiac conditions-
dc.titleFamily Communication in Inherited Cardiovascular Conditions in Ireland-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailShipman, HE: shipmanh@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10897-016-9974-5-
dc.identifier.pmid27271705-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84976291215-
dc.identifier.hkuros279704-
dc.identifier.volume25-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1317-
dc.identifier.epage1326-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000388177100020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl1059-7700-

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