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Article: Prevalence of anxiety disorders in community dwelling older adults in Hong Kong

TitlePrevalence of anxiety disorders in community dwelling older adults in Hong Kong
Authors
Keywordsprevalence
anxiety disorders
communityolder
adults
memory
Issue Date2017
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=IPG
Citation
International Psychogeriatrics: the official journal of the Interntional Psychogeriatric Association, 2017, v. 29 n. 2, p. 259-267 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Anxiety disorders are prevalent yet under-recognized in late life. We examined the prevalence of anxiety disorders in a representative sample of community dwelling older adults in Hong Kong. Method: Data on 1,158 non-demented respondents aged 60–75 years were extracted from the Hong Kong Mental Morbidity survey (HKMMS). Anxiety was assessed with the revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R). Result: One hundred and thirty-seven respondents (11.9%, 95% CI = 10–13.7%) had common mental disorders with a CIS-R score of 12 or above. 8% (95% CI = 6.5–9.6%) had anxiety, 2.2% (95% CI = 1.3–3%) had an anxiety disorder comorbid with depressive disorder, and 1.7% (95% CI = 1–2.5%) had depression. Anxious individuals were more likely to be females (χ 2 = 25.3, p < 0.001), had higher chronic physical burden (t = −9.3, p < 0.001), lower SF-12 physical functioning score (t = 9.2, p < 0.001), and poorer delayed recall (t = 2.3, p = 0.022). The risk of anxiety was higher for females (OR 2.8, 95% C.I. 1.7–4.6, p < 0.001) and those with physical illnesses (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.3–1.6, p < 0.001). The risk of anxiety disorders increased in those with disorders of cardiovascular (OR 1.9, 95% C.I. 1.2–2.9, p = 0.003), musculoskeletal (OR 2.0, 95% C.I. 1.5–2.7, p < 0.001), and genitourinary system (OR 2.0, 95% C.I. 1.3–3.2, p = 0.002). Conclusions: The prevalence of anxiety disorders in Hong Kong older population was 8%. Female gender and those with poor physical health were at a greater risk of developing anxiety disorders. Our findings also suggested potential risk for early sign of memory impairment in cognitively healthy individuals with anxiety disorders.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241786
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.94
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.068
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFung, AWT-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WC-
dc.contributor.authorWong, SM-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.contributor.authorNg, MK-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HME-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorHung, SF-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, EFC-
dc.contributor.authorSham, PC-
dc.contributor.authorChiu, HFK-
dc.contributor.authorLam, M-
dc.contributor.authorChiang, TP-
dc.contributor.authorvan Os, J-
dc.contributor.authorLau, JTF-
dc.contributor.authorLewis, G-
dc.contributor.authorBebbington, P-
dc.contributor.authorLam, LCW-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T01:48:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-20T01:48:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Psychogeriatrics: the official journal of the Interntional Psychogeriatric Association, 2017, v. 29 n. 2, p. 259-267-
dc.identifier.issn1041-6102-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241786-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Anxiety disorders are prevalent yet under-recognized in late life. We examined the prevalence of anxiety disorders in a representative sample of community dwelling older adults in Hong Kong. Method: Data on 1,158 non-demented respondents aged 60–75 years were extracted from the Hong Kong Mental Morbidity survey (HKMMS). Anxiety was assessed with the revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R). Result: One hundred and thirty-seven respondents (11.9%, 95% CI = 10–13.7%) had common mental disorders with a CIS-R score of 12 or above. 8% (95% CI = 6.5–9.6%) had anxiety, 2.2% (95% CI = 1.3–3%) had an anxiety disorder comorbid with depressive disorder, and 1.7% (95% CI = 1–2.5%) had depression. Anxious individuals were more likely to be females (χ 2 = 25.3, p < 0.001), had higher chronic physical burden (t = −9.3, p < 0.001), lower SF-12 physical functioning score (t = 9.2, p < 0.001), and poorer delayed recall (t = 2.3, p = 0.022). The risk of anxiety was higher for females (OR 2.8, 95% C.I. 1.7–4.6, p < 0.001) and those with physical illnesses (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.3–1.6, p < 0.001). The risk of anxiety disorders increased in those with disorders of cardiovascular (OR 1.9, 95% C.I. 1.2–2.9, p = 0.003), musculoskeletal (OR 2.0, 95% C.I. 1.5–2.7, p < 0.001), and genitourinary system (OR 2.0, 95% C.I. 1.3–3.2, p = 0.002). Conclusions: The prevalence of anxiety disorders in Hong Kong older population was 8%. Female gender and those with poor physical health were at a greater risk of developing anxiety disorders. Our findings also suggested potential risk for early sign of memory impairment in cognitively healthy individuals with anxiety disorders.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=IPG-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Psychogeriatrics: the official journal of the Interntional Psychogeriatric Association-
dc.rightsInternational Psychogeriatrics: the official journal of the Interntional Psychogeriatric Association. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsThis article has been published in a revised form in [Journal] [http://doi.org/XXX]. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © copyright holder.-
dc.subjectprevalence-
dc.subjectanxiety disorders-
dc.subjectcommunityolder-
dc.subjectadults-
dc.subjectmemory-
dc.titlePrevalence of anxiety disorders in community dwelling older adults in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, WC: waicchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNg, MK: rmkng@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, HME: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, WC=rp01687-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HME=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1041610216001617-
dc.identifier.pmid27766997-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84992126884-
dc.identifier.hkuros272747-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage259-
dc.identifier.epage267-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000397247800009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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