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Conference Paper: Biomedical Common Year 1 Programme: What factors predict career intention to be Doctor?

TitleBiomedical Common Year 1 Programme: What factors predict career intention to be Doctor?
Authors
KeywordsBiomedical and Health Science Students
New Zealand
Motivation
Physical Wellbeing
Competitiveness
Motivation
Academic Achievement
Issue Date2016
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
Citation
The 13th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC 2016), Singapore, 13-17 January 2016. In Medical Education, 2016, v. 50 suppl. 2, p. 22, abstract no. 55 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Biomedical Common Year 1 occurs prior to admission to the medical programme. Students achieving a grade point average over 6.0 are eligible for an admissions interview. The research question of the study was, “If students have a definite interest in becoming a future doctor in their premedical course, does this relate to their levels of motivation, competitiveness, perceived stress, quality of life and grade attainment?” A total of 1369 students who completed a high stakes biosciences assessment were asked to disclose their grade (converted to a numerical value) and to complete the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, a World Health Organisation Quality Of Life (QoL) questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, and Revised Competitiveness Index. To explore differences between those students who aimed to be doctors vs those who did not, a binary logistic regression was conducted. Twenty five percent of students participated in the research. Significant predictors of course intention (medicine; other) were academic attainment, perceived stress, and physical and environmental QoL. Post hoc analyses revealed that perceived stress and physical QoL were moderating variables. Students with an intention to become a doctor tend to attain higher grades and have better environmental quality of life scores. This may indicate that students who are admitted into medical school gain higher grades but also likely come from more affluent and well-resourced backgrounds. Physical health problems and perceived stress are likely to moderate the impact of grade achievement, environmental QoL, competition and motivation.
DescriptionSession - Assessment (Abstract)
This free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the 13th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC) ... 2016
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/238558
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 6.251
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.776
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHenning, MA-
dc.contributor.authorKrägeloh, CU-
dc.contributor.authorBooth, R-
dc.contributor.authorHill, EM-
dc.contributor.authorChen, JY-
dc.contributor.authorWebster, C-
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-16T00:49:25Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-16T00:49:25Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC 2016), Singapore, 13-17 January 2016. In Medical Education, 2016, v. 50 suppl. 2, p. 22, abstract no. 55-
dc.identifier.issn0308-0110-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/238558-
dc.descriptionSession - Assessment (Abstract)-
dc.descriptionThis free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the 13th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC) ... 2016-
dc.description.abstractThe Biomedical Common Year 1 occurs prior to admission to the medical programme. Students achieving a grade point average over 6.0 are eligible for an admissions interview. The research question of the study was, “If students have a definite interest in becoming a future doctor in their premedical course, does this relate to their levels of motivation, competitiveness, perceived stress, quality of life and grade attainment?” A total of 1369 students who completed a high stakes biosciences assessment were asked to disclose their grade (converted to a numerical value) and to complete the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, a World Health Organisation Quality Of Life (QoL) questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, and Revised Competitiveness Index. To explore differences between those students who aimed to be doctors vs those who did not, a binary logistic regression was conducted. Twenty five percent of students participated in the research. Significant predictors of course intention (medicine; other) were academic attainment, perceived stress, and physical and environmental QoL. Post hoc analyses revealed that perceived stress and physical QoL were moderating variables. Students with an intention to become a doctor tend to attain higher grades and have better environmental quality of life scores. This may indicate that students who are admitted into medical school gain higher grades but also likely come from more affluent and well-resourced backgrounds. Physical health problems and perceived stress are likely to moderate the impact of grade achievement, environmental QoL, competition and motivation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110-
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Education-
dc.subjectBiomedical and Health Science Students-
dc.subjectNew Zealand-
dc.subjectMotivation-
dc.subjectPhysical Wellbeing-
dc.subjectCompetitiveness-
dc.subjectMotivation-
dc.subjectAcademic Achievement-
dc.titleBiomedical Common Year 1 Programme: What factors predict career intention to be Doctor?-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailChen, JY: chenjy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, JY=rp00526-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/medu.13157-
dc.identifier.hkuros271316-
dc.identifier.volume50-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 2-
dc.identifier.spage22, abstract no. 55-
dc.identifier.epage22, abstract no. 55-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000384011100002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 170116-
dc.identifier.issnl0308-0110-

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