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Article: Family-based smoking cessation intervention for smoking fathers and nonsmoking mothers with a child: a randomized controlled trial

TitleFamily-based smoking cessation intervention for smoking fathers and nonsmoking mothers with a child: a randomized controlled trial
Authors
Keywordsfather
secondhand smoke
smoking cessation
cotinine
child
Issue Date2017
Citation
Journal of Pediatrics, 2017, v. 182, p. 260-266.e4 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2016 Elsevier Inc.Objective To examine whether a family-based intervention targeting both smoking fathers and nonsmoking mothers in well-child health clinics is effective in increasing fathers' abstinence from cigarette smoking. Study design This parallel 2-arm randomized controlled trial recruited a total of 1158 families with a daily-smoking father, a nonsmoking mother, and a child aged 0-18 months from the 22 maternal and child health centers in Hong Kong. The intervention group received the family-based intervention, including 6 nurse-led individual face-to-face and telephone counseling sessions within 1 month after recruitment and a voluntary face-to-face family counseling session (FCS). The control group received a leaflet, a self-help booklet, and brief quitting advice only. Father-reported 7-day and 6-month abstinence, smoking reduction, quit attempts, mother-reported help and support, and child salivary cotinine level were assessed at 12 months. Generalized estimating equation models were used to compare these outcomes between the 2 study groups. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group reported a greater prevalence of 7-day (13.7% vs 8.0%; OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.16-3.17; P < .01) and 6-month self-reported abstinence (13.4% vs. 7.5%; OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.30-3.40; P < .01). Within the intervention group, compared with receipt of individual counseling only, participation in the FCS was associated with increases in fathers' self-reported abstinence (20.2% vs 12.3%; P = .02), mothers' help (66.1% vs 43.8%; P < .01), and support to the fathers (55.0% vs 45.4%; P < .01). Conclusions The family-based smoking cessation intervention for the families in the well-child healthcare setting was effective in increasing the fathers' self-reported abstinence. Additional participation in the FCS increased mothers' help and support to the fathers. Trial registration Controlled-trials.com: ISRCTN99111655; Hkuctr.com: HKUCTR-465.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237722
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.406
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.849
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSC-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YTD-
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT-
dc.contributor.authorEmmons, K-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YMA-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, DYP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-20T02:27:26Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-20T02:27:26Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Pediatrics, 2017, v. 182, p. 260-266.e4-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3476-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237722-
dc.description.abstract© 2016 Elsevier Inc.Objective To examine whether a family-based intervention targeting both smoking fathers and nonsmoking mothers in well-child health clinics is effective in increasing fathers' abstinence from cigarette smoking. Study design This parallel 2-arm randomized controlled trial recruited a total of 1158 families with a daily-smoking father, a nonsmoking mother, and a child aged 0-18 months from the 22 maternal and child health centers in Hong Kong. The intervention group received the family-based intervention, including 6 nurse-led individual face-to-face and telephone counseling sessions within 1 month after recruitment and a voluntary face-to-face family counseling session (FCS). The control group received a leaflet, a self-help booklet, and brief quitting advice only. Father-reported 7-day and 6-month abstinence, smoking reduction, quit attempts, mother-reported help and support, and child salivary cotinine level were assessed at 12 months. Generalized estimating equation models were used to compare these outcomes between the 2 study groups. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group reported a greater prevalence of 7-day (13.7% vs 8.0%; OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.16-3.17; P < .01) and 6-month self-reported abstinence (13.4% vs. 7.5%; OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.30-3.40; P < .01). Within the intervention group, compared with receipt of individual counseling only, participation in the FCS was associated with increases in fathers' self-reported abstinence (20.2% vs 12.3%; P = .02), mothers' help (66.1% vs 43.8%; P < .01), and support to the fathers (55.0% vs 45.4%; P < .01). Conclusions The family-based smoking cessation intervention for the families in the well-child healthcare setting was effective in increasing the fathers' self-reported abstinence. Additional participation in the FCS increased mothers' help and support to the fathers. Trial registration Controlled-trials.com: ISRCTN99111655; Hkuctr.com: HKUCTR-465.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pediatrics-
dc.subjectfather-
dc.subjectsecondhand smoke-
dc.subjectsmoking cessation-
dc.subjectcotinine-
dc.subjectchild-
dc.titleFamily-based smoking cessation intervention for smoking fathers and nonsmoking mothers with a child: a randomized controlled trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: nssophia@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, YTD: takderek@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, YMA: angela.leung.hku414@gmail.com-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423-
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, YMA=rp00405-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.11.021-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85008420018-
dc.identifier.hkuros270954-
dc.identifier.hkuros271871-
dc.identifier.volume182-
dc.identifier.spage260-
dc.identifier.epage266.e4-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000396252400042-
dc.identifier.issnl0022-3476-

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