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Article: Microscopic decision model for pedestrian route choice at signalized crosswalks

TitleMicroscopic decision model for pedestrian route choice at signalized crosswalks
Authors
Keywordsbidirectional pedestrian movements
discrete choice model
panel data
pedestrian decision model
pedestrian route choice
random-parameter model
Issue Date2016
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.advanced-transport.com
Citation
Journal of Advanced Transportation, 2016, v. 50 n. 6, p. 1181-1192 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this paper, two-tier mathematical models were developed to simulate the microscopic pedestrian decision-making process of route choice at signalized crosswalks. In the first tier, a discrete choice model was proposed to predict the choices of walking direction. In the second tier, an exponential model was calibrated to determine the step size in the chosen direction. First, a utility function was defined in the first-tier model to describe the change of utility in response to deviation from a pedestrian's target direction and the conflicting effects of neighboring pedestrians. A mixed logit model was adopted to estimate the effects of the explanatory variables on the pedestrians' decisions. Compared with the standard multinomial logit model, it was shown that the mixed logit model could accommodate the heterogeneity. The repeated observations for each pedestrian were grouped as panel data to ensure that the parameters remained constant for individual pedestrians but varied among the pedestrians. The mixed logit model with panel data was found to effectively address inter-pedestrian heterogeneity and resulted in a better fit than the standard multinomial logit model. Second, an exponential model in the second tier was proposed to further determine the step size of individual pedestrians in the chosen direction; it indicates the change in walking speed in response to the presence of other pedestrians. Finally, validation was conducted on an independent set of observation data in Hong Kong. The pedestrians' routes and destinations were predicted with the two-tier models. Compared with the tracked trajectories, the average error between the predicted destinations and the observed destinations was within an acceptable margin. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237007
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.419
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.911
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXie, S-
dc.contributor.authorWong, SC-
dc.contributor.authorLam, WHK-
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-20T06:14:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-20T06:14:44Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Advanced Transportation, 2016, v. 50 n. 6, p. 1181-1192-
dc.identifier.issn0197-6729-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237007-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, two-tier mathematical models were developed to simulate the microscopic pedestrian decision-making process of route choice at signalized crosswalks. In the first tier, a discrete choice model was proposed to predict the choices of walking direction. In the second tier, an exponential model was calibrated to determine the step size in the chosen direction. First, a utility function was defined in the first-tier model to describe the change of utility in response to deviation from a pedestrian's target direction and the conflicting effects of neighboring pedestrians. A mixed logit model was adopted to estimate the effects of the explanatory variables on the pedestrians' decisions. Compared with the standard multinomial logit model, it was shown that the mixed logit model could accommodate the heterogeneity. The repeated observations for each pedestrian were grouped as panel data to ensure that the parameters remained constant for individual pedestrians but varied among the pedestrians. The mixed logit model with panel data was found to effectively address inter-pedestrian heterogeneity and resulted in a better fit than the standard multinomial logit model. Second, an exponential model in the second tier was proposed to further determine the step size of individual pedestrians in the chosen direction; it indicates the change in walking speed in response to the presence of other pedestrians. Finally, validation was conducted on an independent set of observation data in Hong Kong. The pedestrians' routes and destinations were predicted with the two-tier models. Compared with the tracked trajectories, the average error between the predicted destinations and the observed destinations was within an acceptable margin. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.advanced-transport.com-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Advanced Transportation-
dc.rightsJournal of Advanced Transportation. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Journal of Advanced Transportation, 2016, v. 50 n. 6, p. 1181-1192, which has been published in final form at DOI: 10.1002/atr.1396. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.-
dc.subjectbidirectional pedestrian movements-
dc.subjectdiscrete choice model-
dc.subjectpanel data-
dc.subjectpedestrian decision model-
dc.subjectpedestrian route choice-
dc.subjectrandom-parameter model-
dc.titleMicroscopic decision model for pedestrian route choice at signalized crosswalks-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, SC: hhecwsc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SC=rp00191-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/atr.1396-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84978827307-
dc.identifier.hkuros270741-
dc.identifier.volume50-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1181-
dc.identifier.epage1192-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000386040200014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl0197-6729-

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