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Conference Paper: Assessing students' integrative learning in biomedical engineering from the perspectives of structure, behavior, and function

TitleAssessing students' integrative learning in biomedical engineering from the perspectives of structure, behavior, and function
Authors
KeywordsBiomedical engineering education
Integrated learning
Learning Sciences
Structure-behavior-function (SBF) framework
Issue Date2010
PublisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/conhome.jsp?punumber=1000297
Citation
40th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE 2010), Washington, DC, 27-30 October 2010. In 2010 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2010, p. S1G-1-S1G-6 How to Cite?
AbstractLearning in biomedical engineering is highly interdisciplinary: students need to integrate concepts between engineering and life sciences, and be able to design and develop technologies with physiological considerations. In this study, biomedical engineering students’ artifacts were analyzed in detail according to the structure-behavior-framework (SBF) framework. The SBF framework has been investigated by educational researchers and learning scientists; in particular, the behavioral and functional dimensions were proved to be related to a sophisticated level of understanding of complex systems. Existing research results also indicate that experts (or expert-like learners) show a deeper understanding of the behavioral and functional aspects of systems. In the current study, a 5-level scale comprising structural, behavioral, and functional dimensions of integrated learning was constructed to assess student learning in a biomedical engineering project course. Our results indicate that high achievers and low achievers were different in the behavioral and functional dimensions. The results also indicate significant relationships between behavioral and functional dimensions of learning and students’ final course performance. These findings align with existing results in cognitive science and learning sciences on expert-novice differences, which help connecting engineering educational inquiries to the rich body of literature and findings in human learning.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/99428
ISBN
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, YY-
dc.contributor.authorYu, ACH-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKK-
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T18:29:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T18:29:45Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citation40th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE 2010), Washington, DC, 27-30 October 2010. In 2010 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2010, p. S1G-1-S1G-6-
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4244-6261-2-
dc.identifier.issn0190-5848-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/99428-
dc.description.abstractLearning in biomedical engineering is highly interdisciplinary: students need to integrate concepts between engineering and life sciences, and be able to design and develop technologies with physiological considerations. In this study, biomedical engineering students’ artifacts were analyzed in detail according to the structure-behavior-framework (SBF) framework. The SBF framework has been investigated by educational researchers and learning scientists; in particular, the behavioral and functional dimensions were proved to be related to a sophisticated level of understanding of complex systems. Existing research results also indicate that experts (or expert-like learners) show a deeper understanding of the behavioral and functional aspects of systems. In the current study, a 5-level scale comprising structural, behavioral, and functional dimensions of integrated learning was constructed to assess student learning in a biomedical engineering project course. Our results indicate that high achievers and low achievers were different in the behavioral and functional dimensions. The results also indicate significant relationships between behavioral and functional dimensions of learning and students’ final course performance. These findings align with existing results in cognitive science and learning sciences on expert-novice differences, which help connecting engineering educational inquiries to the rich body of literature and findings in human learning.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/conhome.jsp?punumber=1000297-
dc.relation.ispartof2010 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)-
dc.rights©2010 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.-
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering education-
dc.subjectIntegrated learning-
dc.subjectLearning Sciences-
dc.subjectStructure-behavior-function (SBF) framework-
dc.titleAssessing students' integrative learning in biomedical engineering from the perspectives of structure, behavior, and function-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailChan, YY: yychan8@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYu, ACH: alfred.yu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CKK: ckkchan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YY=rp01503-
dc.identifier.authorityYu, ACH=rp00657-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CKK=rp00891-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/FIE.2010.5673660-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78751513555-
dc.identifier.hkuros169213-
dc.identifier.spageS1G-1-
dc.identifier.epageS1G-6-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287083200216-
dc.publisher.placeWashington, DC-

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