File Download

Conference Paper: Assessing student collaboration and learning in medical engineering from the perspectives of structures, behaviors, and function

TitleAssessing student collaboration and learning in medical engineering from the perspectives of structures, behaviors, and function
Authors
KeywordsBiomedical engineering education
Integrated learning
Learning Sciences
Structure-behavior-function (SBF) framework
Issue Date2010
PublisherIEEE.
Citation
40th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE 2010), Washington, DC, 27-30 October 2010, p. S1G-1-6 How to Cite?
AbstractLearning in biomedical engineering is highly interdisciplinary: students need to integrate concepts between engineering and life sciences, and be able to design and develop technologies with physiological considerations. In this study, biomedical engineering students’ artifacts were analyzed in detail according to the structure-behavior-framework (SBF) framework. The SBF framework has been investigated by educational researchers and learning scientists; in particular, the behavioral and functional dimensions were proved to be related to a sophisticated level of understanding of complex systems. Existing research results also indicate that experts (or expert-like learners) show a deeper understanding of the behavioral and functional aspects of systems. In the current study, a 5- level scale comprising structural, behavioral, andfunctional dimensions of integrated learning was constructed to assess student learning in a biomedical engineering project course. Our results indicate that high achievers and low achievers were different in the behavioral and functional dimensions. The results also indicate significant relationships between behavioral and functional dimensions of learning and students’ final course performance. These findings align with existing results in cognitive science and learning sciences on expert-novice differences, which help connecting engineering educational inquiries to the rich body of literature and findings in human learning.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/99428
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, YYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, ACHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T18:29:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T18:29:45Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citation40th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE 2010), Washington, DC, 27-30 October 2010, p. S1G-1-6-
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4244-6259-9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/99428-
dc.description.abstractLearning in biomedical engineering is highly interdisciplinary: students need to integrate concepts between engineering and life sciences, and be able to design and develop technologies with physiological considerations. In this study, biomedical engineering students’ artifacts were analyzed in detail according to the structure-behavior-framework (SBF) framework. The SBF framework has been investigated by educational researchers and learning scientists; in particular, the behavioral and functional dimensions were proved to be related to a sophisticated level of understanding of complex systems. Existing research results also indicate that experts (or expert-like learners) show a deeper understanding of the behavioral and functional aspects of systems. In the current study, a 5- level scale comprising structural, behavioral, andfunctional dimensions of integrated learning was constructed to assess student learning in a biomedical engineering project course. Our results indicate that high achievers and low achievers were different in the behavioral and functional dimensions. The results also indicate significant relationships between behavioral and functional dimensions of learning and students’ final course performance. These findings align with existing results in cognitive science and learning sciences on expert-novice differences, which help connecting engineering educational inquiries to the rich body of literature and findings in human learning.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherIEEE.-
dc.relation.ispartofASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE)en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBiomedical engineering education-
dc.subjectIntegrated learning-
dc.subjectLearning Sciences-
dc.subjectStructure-behavior-function (SBF) framework-
dc.titleAssessing student collaboration and learning in medical engineering from the perspectives of structures, behaviors, and functionen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, YY: yychan8@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYu, ACH: alfred.yu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CKK: ckkchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YY=rp01503en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYu, ACH=rp00657en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169213en_HK
dc.identifier.spageS1G-1-
dc.identifier.epageS1G-6-
dc.publisher.placeWashington DC-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats