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Conference Paper: Defect emissions in ZnO nanostructures

TitleDefect emissions in ZnO nanostructures
Authors
KeywordsMetal oxides
Nanostructures
Issue Date2005
PublisherS P I E - International Society for Optical Engineering. The Journal's web site is located at http://spie.org/x1848.xml
Citation
Proceedings of SPIE, v. 5925, p. 59250F: 1-8 How to Cite?
AbstractZinc oxide (ZnO) is of great interest in photonic applications due to its wide bandgap (3.37 eV) and high exciton binding energy (60 meV). In the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of ZnO, typically one U V band-edge emission peak and one or more peaks at the visible spectral range due to defect emission are observed. The PL emission of ZnO is commonly green, but other colors like yellow and orange are also reported. Out of the different visible peaks, the origin of the green one is the most controversial. The most commonly cited explanation for it is the transition between a singly oxidized oxygen vacancy and a photoexcited hole [K. Vanheusden, C. H. Seager, W. L. Warren, D. R. Tallant, and J. A. Voigt, Appl. Phys. Lett. 68, 403 (1996).]. However, this hypothesis is established on ZnO phosphors but not on nanostructured samples. In this work, several ZnO nanostructures (nanorods, nanoneedles, nanoshells and tetrapod nanorods) were synthesized by thermal evaporation and chemical methods. The obtained nanostructures were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL), and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). It was found that fabrication methods significantly affect the defect emissions of the nanostructures. For different fabrication conditions, defect emissions in the green, yellow, and orange spectral ranges were observed. No correlation was found between the deep levels responsible for the visible emission and the EPR signal. Origins of the different defect emissions are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/97036
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDjurišić, ABen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTarn, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDing, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorGe, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, WKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T16:54:06Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T16:54:06Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of SPIE, v. 5925, p. 59250F: 1-8en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0277-786Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/97036-
dc.description.abstractZinc oxide (ZnO) is of great interest in photonic applications due to its wide bandgap (3.37 eV) and high exciton binding energy (60 meV). In the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of ZnO, typically one U V band-edge emission peak and one or more peaks at the visible spectral range due to defect emission are observed. The PL emission of ZnO is commonly green, but other colors like yellow and orange are also reported. Out of the different visible peaks, the origin of the green one is the most controversial. The most commonly cited explanation for it is the transition between a singly oxidized oxygen vacancy and a photoexcited hole [K. Vanheusden, C. H. Seager, W. L. Warren, D. R. Tallant, and J. A. Voigt, Appl. Phys. Lett. 68, 403 (1996).]. However, this hypothesis is established on ZnO phosphors but not on nanostructured samples. In this work, several ZnO nanostructures (nanorods, nanoneedles, nanoshells and tetrapod nanorods) were synthesized by thermal evaporation and chemical methods. The obtained nanostructures were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL), and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). It was found that fabrication methods significantly affect the defect emissions of the nanostructures. For different fabrication conditions, defect emissions in the green, yellow, and orange spectral ranges were observed. No correlation was found between the deep levels responsible for the visible emission and the EPR signal. Origins of the different defect emissions are discussed.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherS P I E - International Society for Optical Engineering. The Journal's web site is located at http://spie.org/x1848.xmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineeringen_HK
dc.subjectMetal oxidesen_HK
dc.subjectNanostructuresen_HK
dc.titleDefect emissions in ZnO nanostructuresen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDjurišić, AB: dalek@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, WK: waichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDjurišić, AB=rp00690en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, WK=rp00667en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.614047en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-31844442243en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros148837en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-31844442243&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5925en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage8en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDjurišić, AB=7004904830en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, YH=7201463866en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTarn, KH=12140704400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDing, L=10639111500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGe, WK=7103160307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, WK=13310083000en_HK

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