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Article: Association of candidate susceptible loci with chronic infection with hepatitis B virus in a Chinese population
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TitleAssociation of candidate susceptible loci with chronic infection with hepatitis B virus in a Chinese population
 
AuthorsChen, DQ1
Zeng, Y1
Zhou, J1
Yang, L1
Jiang, S2
Huang, JD1
Lu, L1
Zheng, BJ1
 
KeywordsDisease prevalence
Genetic susceptibility
Hepatitis B virus
Multifactor dimensionality reduction
PCR-RFLP
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32763
 
CitationJournal Of Medical Virology, 2010, v. 82 n. 3, p. 371-378 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21716
 
AbstractA number of genetic loci have been proposed to be associated with persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study aimed to evaluate the association and interaction of susceptible genes with HBV persistence in a Chinese population. A total of 17 polymorphisms in 9 candidate genes were studied in 361 Chinese chronic hepatitis B patients and 304 patients who recovered spontaneously. Distributions of susceptible polymorphisms were examined in healthy Chinese and Caucasian populations. Gene-gene interactions were tested by the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method. The TNF -308 G/G genotype and G allele, IL-10RB codon 47 A allele, and MCP-1 -2518 G/G genotype and G allele were more frequent in patients than controls (P<0.01, after multiple corrections Pc<0.05), while the frequencies of TNF -308 A/G genotype and IL-10 -592 A/A genotype were significantly higher in controls than in the patient group (Pc<0.05). The frequencies of the risk allele MCP-1 -2518 G and CTLA4 6230 G were much higher in Chinese than in the Caucasian groups (P<0.001). An interaction between CCR5-2459, TNFA-863, IL-10RB codon 47, and MCP-1 -2518 was detected by MDR (P=0.001). The results indicate that genetic determinants may affect the outcome of HBV infection in both independent and synergic manners. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
ISSN0146-6615
2013 Impact Factor: 2.217
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21716
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000273955000003
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

Grant sponsor: University of Hong Kong (University Development Fund, partial support).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChen, DQ
 
dc.contributor.authorZeng, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, J
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, L
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, S
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, JD
 
dc.contributor.authorLu, L
 
dc.contributor.authorZheng, BJ
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:24:16Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:24:16Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractA number of genetic loci have been proposed to be associated with persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study aimed to evaluate the association and interaction of susceptible genes with HBV persistence in a Chinese population. A total of 17 polymorphisms in 9 candidate genes were studied in 361 Chinese chronic hepatitis B patients and 304 patients who recovered spontaneously. Distributions of susceptible polymorphisms were examined in healthy Chinese and Caucasian populations. Gene-gene interactions were tested by the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method. The TNF -308 G/G genotype and G allele, IL-10RB codon 47 A allele, and MCP-1 -2518 G/G genotype and G allele were more frequent in patients than controls (P<0.01, after multiple corrections Pc<0.05), while the frequencies of TNF -308 A/G genotype and IL-10 -592 A/A genotype were significantly higher in controls than in the patient group (Pc<0.05). The frequencies of the risk allele MCP-1 -2518 G and CTLA4 6230 G were much higher in Chinese than in the Caucasian groups (P<0.001). An interaction between CCR5-2459, TNFA-863, IL-10RB codon 47, and MCP-1 -2518 was detected by MDR (P=0.001). The results indicate that genetic determinants may affect the outcome of HBV infection in both independent and synergic manners. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Virology, 2010, v. 82 n. 3, p. 371-378 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21716
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21716
 
dc.identifier.eissn1096-9071
 
dc.identifier.epage378
 
dc.identifier.hkuros175100
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273955000003
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

Grant sponsor: University of Hong Kong (University Development Fund, partial support).

 
dc.identifier.issn0146-6615
2013 Impact Factor: 2.217
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid20087947
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75449084025
 
dc.identifier.spage371
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91718
 
dc.identifier.volume82
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32763
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Virology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group
 
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGene Frequency
 
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Disease
 
dc.subject.meshGenotype
 
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B, Chronic - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPoint Mutation
 
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Genetic
 
dc.subjectDisease prevalence
 
dc.subjectGenetic susceptibility
 
dc.subjectHepatitis B virus
 
dc.subjectMultifactor dimensionality reduction
 
dc.subjectPCR-RFLP
 
dc.titleAssociation of candidate susceptible loci with chronic infection with hepatitis B virus in a Chinese population
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Jiang, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Huang, JD</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lu, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zheng, BJ</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. New York Blood Center