File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Components of the metabolic syndrome predictive of its development: A 6-year longitudinal study in Hong Kong Chinese

TitleComponents of the metabolic syndrome predictive of its development: A 6-year longitudinal study in Hong Kong Chinese
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2008
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 2008, v. 68 n. 5, p. 730-737 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To investigate which of the components of the metabolic syndrome best predict its development. Design: Long-term cohort of randomly selected adults. Patients: One thousand five hundred and forty-eight subjects from the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study who did not have the metabolic syndrome by the US National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) or International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria at baseline. Measurements: Waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL). Results: After a median interval of 6.4 years, there were 219 and 143 new cases (21.9 and 14.3 per 1000 person-years) of the metabolic syndrome by the NCEP and IDF criteria, respectively. The odds ratio for the NCEP metabolic syndrome was highest for low HDL, 4.08 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.90-5.73] and that for the IDF metabolic syndrome was highest for central obesity, 5.94 [95% CI: 3.98-8.87]. Low HDL, found in 27.8% men and 34.3% women, had the highest sensitivity for the NCEP metabolic syndrome (48% in men and 57% in women) and the IDF metabolic syndrome (41% in men and 54% in women). Central obesity had the highest positive predictive values except that triglycerides had the highest positive predictive value for the NCEP metabolic syndrome in women. The areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve for waist circumference, triglycerides and HDL were similar. A model that included waist circumference and HDL predicted the metabolic syndrome as well as a model that included all five metabolic syndrome components. Conclusion: Obese Chinese adults should be periodically screened for the metabolic syndrome and have waist and HDL measurement. © 2007 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91645
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWat, NMSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, CHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:22:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:22:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 2008, v. 68 n. 5, p. 730-737en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91645-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate which of the components of the metabolic syndrome best predict its development. Design: Long-term cohort of randomly selected adults. Patients: One thousand five hundred and forty-eight subjects from the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study who did not have the metabolic syndrome by the US National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) or International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria at baseline. Measurements: Waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL). Results: After a median interval of 6.4 years, there were 219 and 143 new cases (21.9 and 14.3 per 1000 person-years) of the metabolic syndrome by the NCEP and IDF criteria, respectively. The odds ratio for the NCEP metabolic syndrome was highest for low HDL, 4.08 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.90-5.73] and that for the IDF metabolic syndrome was highest for central obesity, 5.94 [95% CI: 3.98-8.87]. Low HDL, found in 27.8% men and 34.3% women, had the highest sensitivity for the NCEP metabolic syndrome (48% in men and 57% in women) and the IDF metabolic syndrome (41% in men and 54% in women). Central obesity had the highest positive predictive values except that triglycerides had the highest positive predictive value for the NCEP metabolic syndrome in women. The areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve for waist circumference, triglycerides and HDL were similar. A model that included waist circumference and HDL predicted the metabolic syndrome as well as a model that included all five metabolic syndrome components. Conclusion: Obese Chinese adults should be periodically screened for the metabolic syndrome and have waist and HDL measurement. © 2007 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen_HK
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, HDL - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - blood - diagnosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value of Testsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTriglycerides - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshWaist Circumferenceen_HK
dc.titleComponents of the metabolic syndrome predictive of its development: A 6-year longitudinal study in Hong Kong Chineseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY:mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL:ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.2007.03110.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17980012-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-42149159632en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-42149159632&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume68en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage730en_HK
dc.identifier.epage737en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2265-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000254934000008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWat, NMS=6602131754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, S=7202037323en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, CH=37053188100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, J=36040369400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CP=7401968501en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2665506-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats