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Article: Association of a polymorphism in the lipin 1 gene with systolic blood pressure in men

TitleAssociation of a polymorphism in the lipin 1 gene with systolic blood pressure in men
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/amjhyper
Citation
American Journal Of Hypertension, 2008, v. 21 n. 5, p. 539-545 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Lipin 1 plays a role in abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertriglyceridemia. The gene is located at 2p25.1, a susceptibility locus for hypertension. We studied the association of tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the lipin 1 (LPIN1) gene with hypertension and blood pressure. Methods: Twelve tagging SNPs from the HapMap database were genotyped using Sequenom MassArray in 268 hypertensive subjects and 407 normotensive controls, of whom 268 matched the cases in age and sex. Results: None of the tagging SNPs were found to be associated with hypertension after correcting for multiple testing, although carriers of the minor allele of rs10520097 had nominally lower odds for hypertension (P = 0.014). After excluding subjects who were on antihypertensive medications, the minor allele of rs10495584 was nominally associated with lower mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures in men (121.1 ± 14.2 and 76.3 ± 10.2 mm Hg vs. 127.4 ± 15.2 and 80.1 ± 10.5 mm Hg, P = 0.002 and 0.007, respectively), but not in women (P > 0.05). The association of rs10495584 with systolic blood pressure in men remained significant after correcting for multiple testing and adjustment for age, waist circumference, insulin resistance, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (β = -0.158, P = 0.005). An analysis of statistically similar SNPs (ssSNPs) in the regions surrounding rs10495584 suggested that its effect may be caused by its high linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the SNP, rs11524, in which the major allele forms an exonic splicing silencer sequence. Conclusion: Our study provides further evidence that lipin 1 may play a role in blood pressure regulation, especially in men. © 2008 American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91643
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.182
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.397
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOng, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, RYHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, LYFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCherny, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:22:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:22:40Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Hypertension, 2008, v. 21 n. 5, p. 539-545en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0895-7061en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91643-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Lipin 1 plays a role in abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertriglyceridemia. The gene is located at 2p25.1, a susceptibility locus for hypertension. We studied the association of tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the lipin 1 (LPIN1) gene with hypertension and blood pressure. Methods: Twelve tagging SNPs from the HapMap database were genotyped using Sequenom MassArray in 268 hypertensive subjects and 407 normotensive controls, of whom 268 matched the cases in age and sex. Results: None of the tagging SNPs were found to be associated with hypertension after correcting for multiple testing, although carriers of the minor allele of rs10520097 had nominally lower odds for hypertension (P = 0.014). After excluding subjects who were on antihypertensive medications, the minor allele of rs10495584 was nominally associated with lower mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures in men (121.1 ± 14.2 and 76.3 ± 10.2 mm Hg vs. 127.4 ± 15.2 and 80.1 ± 10.5 mm Hg, P = 0.002 and 0.007, respectively), but not in women (P > 0.05). The association of rs10495584 with systolic blood pressure in men remained significant after correcting for multiple testing and adjustment for age, waist circumference, insulin resistance, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (β = -0.158, P = 0.005). An analysis of statistically similar SNPs (ssSNPs) in the regions surrounding rs10495584 suggested that its effect may be caused by its high linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the SNP, rs11524, in which the major allele forms an exonic splicing silencer sequence. Conclusion: Our study provides further evidence that lipin 1 may play a role in blood pressure regulation, especially in men. © 2008 American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/amjhyperen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Hypertensionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure - genetics-
dc.subject.meshHypertension - genetics - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshNuclear Proteins - genetics-
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Single Nucleotide-
dc.titleAssociation of a polymorphism in the lipin 1 gene with systolic blood pressure in menen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0895-7061&volume=21&issue=5&spage=539&epage=545&date=2008&atitle=Association+of+a+polymorphism+in+the+lipin+1+gene+with+systolic+blood+pressure+in+men-
dc.identifier.emailCherny, SS: cherny@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCherny, SS=rp00232en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ajh.2008.21en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18437145-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-42549092827en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros142074-
dc.identifier.hkuros157995-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-42549092827&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage539en_HK
dc.identifier.epage545en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000255009000015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOng, KL=8340854000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, RYH=7101876102en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, LYF=24476809800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCherny, SS=7004670001en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK

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