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Article: Lipocalin-2 is an inflammatory marker closely associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia in humans

TitleLipocalin-2 is an inflammatory marker closely associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia in humans
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2007
PublisherAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinchem.org
Citation
Clinical Chemistry, 2007, v. 53 n. 1, p. 34-41 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Lipocalin-2, a 25-kDa secreted glycoprotein, is a useful biomarker for early detection of various renal injuries. Because lipocalin-2 is abundantly expressed in adipose tissue and liver, we investigated its relevance to obesity-related pathologies. Methods: We used real-time PCR and in-house immunoassays to quantify the mRNA and serum concentrations of lipocalin-2 in C57BL/KsJ db/db obese mice and their age- and sex-matched lean littermates. We analyzed the association between serum lipocalin-2 concentrations and various metabolic and inflammatory variables in 229 persons (121 men and 108 women) recruited from a previous cross-sectional study, and we evaluated the effect of the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone on serum lipocalin-2 concentrations in 32 diabetic patients (21 men and 11 women). Results: Compared with the lean littermates, lipocalin-2 mRNA expression in adipose tissue and liver and its circulating concentrations were significantly increased in db/db diabetic/obese mice (P <0.001). These changes were normalized after rosiglitazone treatment. In humans, circulating lipocalin-2 concentrations were positively correlated (P < 0.005) with adiposity, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, and the insulin resistance index, but negatively correlated (P = 0.002) with HDL cholesterol. There was also a strong positive association between lipocalin-2 concentrations and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), independent of age, sex, and adiposity (P = 0.007). Furthermore, rosiglitazone-mediated decreases in lipocalin-2 concentrations correlated significantly with increases in insulin sensitivity (r = 0.527; P = 0.002) and decreases in hs-CRP concentrations (r = 0.509; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Lipocalin-2 is an inflammatory marker closely related to obesity and its metabolic complications. Measurement of serum lipocalin-2 might be useful for evaluating the outcomes of various clinical interventions for obesity-related metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. © 2007 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91432
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.457
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.472
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKraegen, EWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSweeney, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWat, NMSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, JYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHoo, RLCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:19:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:19:18Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Chemistry, 2007, v. 53 n. 1, p. 34-41en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0009-9147en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/91432-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Lipocalin-2, a 25-kDa secreted glycoprotein, is a useful biomarker for early detection of various renal injuries. Because lipocalin-2 is abundantly expressed in adipose tissue and liver, we investigated its relevance to obesity-related pathologies. Methods: We used real-time PCR and in-house immunoassays to quantify the mRNA and serum concentrations of lipocalin-2 in C57BL/KsJ db/db obese mice and their age- and sex-matched lean littermates. We analyzed the association between serum lipocalin-2 concentrations and various metabolic and inflammatory variables in 229 persons (121 men and 108 women) recruited from a previous cross-sectional study, and we evaluated the effect of the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone on serum lipocalin-2 concentrations in 32 diabetic patients (21 men and 11 women). Results: Compared with the lean littermates, lipocalin-2 mRNA expression in adipose tissue and liver and its circulating concentrations were significantly increased in db/db diabetic/obese mice (P <0.001). These changes were normalized after rosiglitazone treatment. In humans, circulating lipocalin-2 concentrations were positively correlated (P < 0.005) with adiposity, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, and the insulin resistance index, but negatively correlated (P = 0.002) with HDL cholesterol. There was also a strong positive association between lipocalin-2 concentrations and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), independent of age, sex, and adiposity (P = 0.007). Furthermore, rosiglitazone-mediated decreases in lipocalin-2 concentrations correlated significantly with increases in insulin sensitivity (r = 0.527; P = 0.002) and decreases in hs-CRP concentrations (r = 0.509; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Lipocalin-2 is an inflammatory marker closely related to obesity and its metabolic complications. Measurement of serum lipocalin-2 might be useful for evaluating the outcomes of various clinical interventions for obesity-related metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. © 2007 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinchem.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Chemistryen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.subject.meshHyperglycemia - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistance-
dc.subject.meshObesity - blood - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshOncogene Proteins - blood-
dc.subject.meshProto-Oncogene Proteins - blood-
dc.titleLipocalin-2 is an inflammatory marker closely associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia in humansen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, Y: yuwanghk@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTso, AWK: awk.tso@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHoo, RLC: rubyhoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailXu, A: amxu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, Y=rp00239en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTso, AWK=rp00535en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHoo, RLC=rp01334en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityXu, A=rp00485en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1373/clinchem.2006.075614en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17040956-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845973764en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros126089-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845973764&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage34en_HK
dc.identifier.epage41en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1530-8561-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243233200007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Y=34973733700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKraegen, EW=7006873142en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSweeney, G=7102852659en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, J=35504391800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTso, AWK=6701371436en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, WS=7402281153en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWat, NMS=6602131754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, JY=8947805200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHoo, RLC=6602369766en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, A=7202655409en_HK

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