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Article: Abnormality of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

TitleAbnormality of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://lup.sagepub.com
Citation
Lupus, 2007, v. 16 n. 2, p. 121-128 How to Cite?
AbstractBone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are key components of the hematopoietic microenvironment and provide support to hematopoiesis and modulate immune system. Several studies suggest that SLE may be seen as stem cell disorders. However, it is unclear that whether MSCs from SLE patients are defective. So in this research, we studied the biological character of bone marrow derived MSCs in patients with SLE, focused on their phenotype (morphology and immunophenotype), karyotype, cytokines expression and hematopoietic support of MSCs. Our results showed that MSCs from SLE patients and normal controls can be successfully culture-expanded, but the MSCs from SLE grew more slowly than those of normal controls (P < 0.05). Cells from both groups were positive for CD29, CD44 and CD105, and negative for CD14, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR. MSCs from SLE have a normal karyotype. Both groups express IL-6, IL7, IL-11, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) at mRNA level. While IL-6 and IL-7 were down-regulated in MSCs from SLE patient (P < 0.05) at mRNA level. The MSCs from SLE patients and normal controls were infused into ICR (Tac : Icr : Ha strain) mice after high-dose chemotherapy, with no adverse events in either group. Recovery of white blood cells, hemoglobin and platelet was more rapid (P < 0.05) compared with the group without MSCs infusion. We conclude that MSCs in patient with SLE have abnormalities compared with those in normal control. MSCs in patient with SLE may play an important role in the SLE pathogenesis. © 2007 SAGE Publications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88557
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.118
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.878
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, LYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, HYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFeng, XBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHou, YYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLu, LWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, LMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:44:55Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:44:55Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLupus, 2007, v. 16 n. 2, p. 121-128en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0961-2033en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88557-
dc.description.abstractBone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are key components of the hematopoietic microenvironment and provide support to hematopoiesis and modulate immune system. Several studies suggest that SLE may be seen as stem cell disorders. However, it is unclear that whether MSCs from SLE patients are defective. So in this research, we studied the biological character of bone marrow derived MSCs in patients with SLE, focused on their phenotype (morphology and immunophenotype), karyotype, cytokines expression and hematopoietic support of MSCs. Our results showed that MSCs from SLE patients and normal controls can be successfully culture-expanded, but the MSCs from SLE grew more slowly than those of normal controls (P < 0.05). Cells from both groups were positive for CD29, CD44 and CD105, and negative for CD14, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR. MSCs from SLE have a normal karyotype. Both groups express IL-6, IL7, IL-11, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) at mRNA level. While IL-6 and IL-7 were down-regulated in MSCs from SLE patient (P < 0.05) at mRNA level. The MSCs from SLE patients and normal controls were infused into ICR (Tac : Icr : Ha strain) mice after high-dose chemotherapy, with no adverse events in either group. Recovery of white blood cells, hemoglobin and platelet was more rapid (P < 0.05) compared with the group without MSCs infusion. We conclude that MSCs in patient with SLE have abnormalities compared with those in normal control. MSCs in patient with SLE may play an important role in the SLE pathogenesis. © 2007 SAGE Publications.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://lup.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLupusen_HK
dc.rightsLupus. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow Cellsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Proliferationen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshKaryotypingen_HK
dc.subject.meshLupus Erythematosus, Systemic - immunology - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMesenchymal Stem Cells - immunology - pathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.titleAbnormality of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0961-2033&volume=16&issue=2&spage=121&epage=8&date=2007&atitle=Abnormality+of+bone+marrow-derived+mesenchymal+stem+cells+in+patients+with+systemic+lupus+erythematosusen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLu, LW:liweilu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLu, LW=rp00477en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0961203306075793en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17402368-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33847374613en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros132279en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33847374613&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage121en_HK
dc.identifier.epage128en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244665800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK

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