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Article: Symptoms, coping strategies, and timing of presentations in patients with newly diagnosed ovarian cancer.

TitleSymptoms, coping strategies, and timing of presentations in patients with newly diagnosed ovarian cancer.
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ygyno
Citation
Gynecologic Oncology, 2003, v. 90 n. 3, p. 651-656 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: The purpose was to explore whether health education on symptoms of ovarian cancer would aid in early detection, by examining the relationship between symptoms, coping strategies, and timing of presentation in patients with newly diagnosed ovarian cancer. METHODS: Eighty women were included. A questionnaire consisting of a series of open questions was designed to collect information on the sequence of events from the onset of symptoms to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. The Coping Response Inventory (CRI) was used to assess the coping strategies. RESULTS: A majority (90.0%) of women with ovarian cancer did have symptoms before the diagnosis. Abdominal pain or discomfort, abdominal distension, a palpable abdominal mass, menstrual, bowel, or urinary symptoms were the commonly reported symptoms. Eight (10.0%) patients were totally asymptomatic prior to the cancer diagnosis. The presence of bowel symptoms was significantly associated with late stage disease. Most of the patients sought medical advice within 2 weeks from the onset of symptoms. There was no association between the presence of any particular symptom(s) and the timing of presentation. There was also no correlation between the coping strategies and stage of disease and timing of presentation. On average, patients with early stage disease saw one more doctor compared to patients with late stage disease before the affirmative diagnosis of ovarian cancer. CONCLUSION: Most patients presented early after the onset of symptoms. Health education in this regard may not be useful for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87462
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.198
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.284
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, YMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, TYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, LCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:29:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:29:58Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGynecologic Oncology, 2003, v. 90 n. 3, p. 651-656en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0090-8258en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87462-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The purpose was to explore whether health education on symptoms of ovarian cancer would aid in early detection, by examining the relationship between symptoms, coping strategies, and timing of presentation in patients with newly diagnosed ovarian cancer. METHODS: Eighty women were included. A questionnaire consisting of a series of open questions was designed to collect information on the sequence of events from the onset of symptoms to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. The Coping Response Inventory (CRI) was used to assess the coping strategies. RESULTS: A majority (90.0%) of women with ovarian cancer did have symptoms before the diagnosis. Abdominal pain or discomfort, abdominal distension, a palpable abdominal mass, menstrual, bowel, or urinary symptoms were the commonly reported symptoms. Eight (10.0%) patients were totally asymptomatic prior to the cancer diagnosis. The presence of bowel symptoms was significantly associated with late stage disease. Most of the patients sought medical advice within 2 weeks from the onset of symptoms. There was no association between the presence of any particular symptom(s) and the timing of presentation. There was also no correlation between the coping strategies and stage of disease and timing of presentation. On average, patients with early stage disease saw one more doctor compared to patients with late stage disease before the affirmative diagnosis of ovarian cancer. CONCLUSION: Most patients presented early after the onset of symptoms. Health education in this regard may not be useful for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ygynoen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGynecologic oncologyen_HK
dc.titleSymptoms, coping strategies, and timing of presentations in patients with newly diagnosed ovarian cancer.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0090-8258&volume=90&issue=3&spage=651&epage=656&date=2003&atitle=Symptoms,+coping+strategies,+and+timing+of+presentations+in+patients+with+newly+diagnosed+ovarian+canceren_HK
dc.identifier.emailNgan, HY:hysngan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, HY=rp00346en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid13678740-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0142009688en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87517en_HK
dc.identifier.volume90en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage651en_HK
dc.identifier.epage656en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185521000025-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YM=7403676661en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, TY=7402229853en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PW=7406120357en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, HY=34571944100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, LC=7402092003en_HK

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