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Article: A retrospective review on atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance (AGUS) using the Bethesda 2001 classification
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TitleA retrospective review on atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance (AGUS) using the Bethesda 2001 classification
 
AuthorsTam, KF1 2
Cheung, ANY1
Liu, KL1
Ng, TY1
Pun, TC1
Chan, YM1
Wong, LC1
Ng, AWY1
Ngan, HYS1
 
Keywords"Favor neoplasia"
"NOS"
AGC
AGUS
Significant pathology
 
Issue Date2003
 
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ygyno
 
CitationGynecologic Oncology, 2003, v. 91 n. 3, p. 603-607 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2003.08.029
 
AbstractObjectives The Bethesda system for reporting cervicovaginal cytologic diagnoses was recently revised in 2001. Pathologists are required to report not only whether the smear favors neoplastic changes, but also the origin of the abnormal cells. In this study, archival smears were reviewed to evaluate the usefulness of the new classification. Methods Smears having atypical glandular cells taken between January 1995 and December 1997 were reviewed and subclassified according to the revised Bethesda classification. Case records were then reviewed and cases with discrepancies between the cytological evaluation and corresponding final histological diagnoses were further reviewed. Results There were 138 smears reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 47 (range, 18 to 78). Thirty-four smears favored neoplasia and 104 favored "NOS" ("not otherwise specified"). Sixty smears favored endocervical origin and 78 endometrial origin. Forty-three patients (31%) had significant pathologies, including 12 (8.7%) patients with high-grade CIN, 2 (1.4%) with low-grade CIN, 5 (3.6%) with HPV infection, 7 (5.1%) with carcinoma of the corpus, 1 (0.7%) with cervical adenocarcinoma in situ, 4 (2.9%) with adenocarcinoma of the cervix, 3 (2.2%) with endometrial hyperplasia, and 5 (3.6%) with carcinoma of the ovary. Two (1.4%) patients had double primary female genital malignancies and 2 patients (1.4%) had extragenital malignancies. Significant correlation was found between smears "favor neoplasia" and a final diagnosis with significant pathology (χ 2 test, P < 0.05). Significant association was found between AGC favored endocervical origin and a final diagnosis with cervical diseases (χ 2 test, P < 0.05). Four of the 43 patients who had significant pathologies had lesions found during their subsequent visits and all of them had cervical smears classified as AGC "favor neoplasia". Conclusions AGC found on cervical smears are an indication for early and intensive investigation. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0090-8258
2013 Impact Factor: 3.687
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2003.08.029
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000187455100023
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTam, KF
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ANY
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, TY
 
dc.contributor.authorPun, TC
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, YM
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, LC
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, AWY
 
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYS
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:27:52Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:27:52Z
 
dc.date.issued2003
 
dc.description.abstractObjectives The Bethesda system for reporting cervicovaginal cytologic diagnoses was recently revised in 2001. Pathologists are required to report not only whether the smear favors neoplastic changes, but also the origin of the abnormal cells. In this study, archival smears were reviewed to evaluate the usefulness of the new classification. Methods Smears having atypical glandular cells taken between January 1995 and December 1997 were reviewed and subclassified according to the revised Bethesda classification. Case records were then reviewed and cases with discrepancies between the cytological evaluation and corresponding final histological diagnoses were further reviewed. Results There were 138 smears reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 47 (range, 18 to 78). Thirty-four smears favored neoplasia and 104 favored "NOS" ("not otherwise specified"). Sixty smears favored endocervical origin and 78 endometrial origin. Forty-three patients (31%) had significant pathologies, including 12 (8.7%) patients with high-grade CIN, 2 (1.4%) with low-grade CIN, 5 (3.6%) with HPV infection, 7 (5.1%) with carcinoma of the corpus, 1 (0.7%) with cervical adenocarcinoma in situ, 4 (2.9%) with adenocarcinoma of the cervix, 3 (2.2%) with endometrial hyperplasia, and 5 (3.6%) with carcinoma of the ovary. Two (1.4%) patients had double primary female genital malignancies and 2 patients (1.4%) had extragenital malignancies. Significant correlation was found between smears "favor neoplasia" and a final diagnosis with significant pathology (χ 2 test, P < 0.05). Significant association was found between AGC favored endocervical origin and a final diagnosis with cervical diseases (χ 2 test, P < 0.05). Four of the 43 patients who had significant pathologies had lesions found during their subsequent visits and all of them had cervical smears classified as AGC "favor neoplasia". Conclusions AGC found on cervical smears are an indication for early and intensive investigation. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationGynecologic Oncology, 2003, v. 91 n. 3, p. 603-607 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2003.08.029
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2003.08.029
 
dc.identifier.epage607
 
dc.identifier.hkuros86088
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000187455100023
 
dc.identifier.issn0090-8258
2013 Impact Factor: 3.687
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid14675684
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1642272865
 
dc.identifier.spage603
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87297
 
dc.identifier.volume91
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ygyno
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofGynecologic Oncology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinoma - diagnosis - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma in Situ - diagnosis - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshCervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshCervix Uteri - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshEndometrial Hyperplasia - diagnosis - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
 
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshVaginal Smears
 
dc.subject"Favor neoplasia"
 
dc.subject"NOS"
 
dc.subjectAGC
 
dc.subjectAGUS
 
dc.subjectSignificant pathology
 
dc.titleA retrospective review on atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance (AGUS) using the Bethesda 2001 classification
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Cheung, ANY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Liu, KL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ng, TY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Pun, TC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, YM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, LC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ng, AWY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ngan, HYS</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Objectives The Bethesda system for reporting cervicovaginal cytologic diagnoses was recently revised in 2001. Pathologists are required to report not only whether the smear favors neoplastic changes, but also the origin of the abnormal cells. In this study, archival smears were reviewed to evaluate the usefulness of the new classification. Methods Smears having atypical glandular cells taken between January 1995 and December 1997 were reviewed and subclassified according to the revised Bethesda classification. Case records were then reviewed and cases with discrepancies between the cytological evaluation and corresponding final histological diagnoses were further reviewed. Results There were 138 smears reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 47 (range, 18 to 78). Thirty-four smears favored neoplasia and 104 favored &quot;NOS&quot; (&quot;not otherwise specified&quot;). Sixty smears favored endocervical origin and 78 endometrial origin. Forty-three patients (31%) had significant pathologies, including 12 (8.7%) patients with high-grade CIN, 2 (1.4%) with low-grade CIN, 5 (3.6%) with HPV infection, 7 (5.1%) with carcinoma of the corpus, 1 (0.7%) with cervical adenocarcinoma in situ, 4 (2.9%) with adenocarcinoma of the cervix, 3 (2.2%) with endometrial hyperplasia, and 5 (3.6%) with carcinoma of the ovary. Two (1.4%) patients had double primary female genital malignancies and 2 patients (1.4%) had extragenital malignancies. Significant correlation was found between smears &quot;favor neoplasia&quot; and a final diagnosis with significant pathology (&#967; 2 test, P &lt; 0.05). Significant association was found between AGC favored endocervical origin and a final diagnosis with cervical diseases (&#967; 2 test, P &lt; 0.05). Four of the 43 patients who had significant pathologies had lesions found during their subsequent visits and all of them had cervical smears classified as AGC &quot;favor neoplasia&quot;. Conclusions AGC found on cervical smears are an indication for early and intensive investigation. &#169; 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
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<subject>&quot;Favor neoplasia&quot;</subject>
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<subject.mesh>Adult</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Carcinoma in Situ - diagnosis - pathology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - pathology</subject.mesh>
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<subject.mesh>Endometrial Hyperplasia - diagnosis - pathology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Follow-Up Studies</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Middle Aged</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Retrospective Studies</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Vaginal Smears</subject.mesh>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong