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Article: Gestational trophoblastic disease

TitleGestational trophoblastic disease
Authors
KeywordsChemotherapy
Gestational trophoblastic disease
Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia
hCG
Mole
Radiotherapy
Surgery
Issue Date2003
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rigp
Citation
Reviews In Gynaecological Practice, 2003, v. 3 n. 3, p. 142-147 How to Cite?
AbstractGestational trophoblastic disease composed of a spectrum of abnormal trophoblastic proliferation. The benign end is molar pregnancy. Changes in the incidence, clinical presentation and criteria for ultrasonic diagnosis were observed over the years. With the help of cytogenetics, differentiation of hydropic degeneration, partial and complete mole is possible but still confined to research setting. Suction evacuation remained the main stay of treatment. Serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) monitor has to be performed in all post-molar pregnancy and the right choice of assay kit is mandatory to avoid false negative or positive results. The criteria for diagnosing persistent gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) has been agreed and reported in the FIGO 2000 Gynecologic Oncology Committee Report. Investigative tools were also recommended in the same report. The revised FIGO 2000 staging and classification in GTN has incorporated both anatomical staging and risk score classification modified from WHO. A cutoff of six inclusive was recommended to allocate patients into low and high risk groups. Appropriate treatment using single agent such as methotrexate in low risk group and multiple agents such as EMA-CO in high risk group usually resulted in a high cure rate. In drug resistant disease, multiple agents chemotherapy with and without adjuvant surgery or radiotherapy can salvage over 80% of patients. However, patients with both liver and brain metastasis stands a lower chance of survival. To achieve the best outcome for patients with gestational trophoblastic disease, patients should be managed in centers with experience. © 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87245
ISSN
2008 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.124
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:27:12Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:27:12Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationReviews In Gynaecological Practice, 2003, v. 3 n. 3, p. 142-147en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-7697en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87245-
dc.description.abstractGestational trophoblastic disease composed of a spectrum of abnormal trophoblastic proliferation. The benign end is molar pregnancy. Changes in the incidence, clinical presentation and criteria for ultrasonic diagnosis were observed over the years. With the help of cytogenetics, differentiation of hydropic degeneration, partial and complete mole is possible but still confined to research setting. Suction evacuation remained the main stay of treatment. Serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) monitor has to be performed in all post-molar pregnancy and the right choice of assay kit is mandatory to avoid false negative or positive results. The criteria for diagnosing persistent gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) has been agreed and reported in the FIGO 2000 Gynecologic Oncology Committee Report. Investigative tools were also recommended in the same report. The revised FIGO 2000 staging and classification in GTN has incorporated both anatomical staging and risk score classification modified from WHO. A cutoff of six inclusive was recommended to allocate patients into low and high risk groups. Appropriate treatment using single agent such as methotrexate in low risk group and multiple agents such as EMA-CO in high risk group usually resulted in a high cure rate. In drug resistant disease, multiple agents chemotherapy with and without adjuvant surgery or radiotherapy can salvage over 80% of patients. However, patients with both liver and brain metastasis stands a lower chance of survival. To achieve the best outcome for patients with gestational trophoblastic disease, patients should be managed in centers with experience. © 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rigpen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofReviews in Gynaecological Practiceen_HK
dc.rightsReviews in Gynaecological Practice. Copyright © Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectChemotherapyen_HK
dc.subjectGestational trophoblastic diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectGestational trophoblastic neoplasiaen_HK
dc.subjecthCGen_HK
dc.subjectMoleen_HK
dc.subjectRadiotherapyen_HK
dc.subjectSurgeryen_HK
dc.titleGestational trophoblastic diseaseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1471-7697&volume=3&issue=3&spage=142&epage=147&date=2003&atitle=Gestational+trophoblastic+diseaseen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNgan, HYS:hysngan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, HYS=rp00346en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1471-7697(03)00047-9en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2042539195en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87460en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2042539195&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage142en_HK
dc.identifier.epage147en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, HYS=34571944100en_HK

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