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Article: Psychosocial adjustment in gynecologic cancer survivors: A longitudinal study on risk factors for maladjustment

TitlePsychosocial adjustment in gynecologic cancer survivors: A longitudinal study on risk factors for maladjustment
Authors
KeywordsFemale
Gynecologic cancer
Longitudinal
Psychosocial adjustment
Risk factors
Issue Date2001
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ygyno
Citation
Gynecologic Oncology, 2001, v. 80 n. 3, p. 387-394 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. The objective was to describe the change in psychosocial state over time and to identify risk factors for maladjustment in gynecologic cancer survivors. Awareness of these issues is important for planning supportive care services for cancer patients. Methods. A longitudinal prospective study of patients with newly diagnosed gynecologic cancer using individual patients as their own control was performed. Patients were interviewed after confirmation of the diagnosis and were reassessed at 6 and 18 months after completion of treatment and with no evidence of recurrent disease. Psychological adjustment was measured by self-rating on self-esteem, outlook on life, self-role, and femininity. Neuroticism and anxiety were assessed using a neuroticism score and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Depressive symptoms were questioned directly. Social adjustment was assessed by changes in working capacity or work status, leisure activity, marital relationship, and sexual activity. Results. Seventy-four women participated. Adjustment problems did not occur in the majority of patients. Psychosocial adjustment was different for patients receiving different types of treatments. Improvement in feminism (P = 0.050) and neuroticism (P = 0.010) was observed for patients receiving chemotherapy and deterioration was observed in patients treated with surgery. Deterioration in neuroticism was associated with lower education level (P = 0.032). With religious belief, there was better family support and more significant improvement in social activity (P = 0.038). Conclusion. Most patients adapted well. Patients at risk for psychosocial maladjustment include those who are treated surgically, less educated, and without religious belief. © 2001 Academic Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87085
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.198
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.284
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, YMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, BYGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, OWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, GWKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:25:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:25:08Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGynecologic Oncology, 2001, v. 80 n. 3, p. 387-394en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0090-8258en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87085-
dc.description.abstractObjective. The objective was to describe the change in psychosocial state over time and to identify risk factors for maladjustment in gynecologic cancer survivors. Awareness of these issues is important for planning supportive care services for cancer patients. Methods. A longitudinal prospective study of patients with newly diagnosed gynecologic cancer using individual patients as their own control was performed. Patients were interviewed after confirmation of the diagnosis and were reassessed at 6 and 18 months after completion of treatment and with no evidence of recurrent disease. Psychological adjustment was measured by self-rating on self-esteem, outlook on life, self-role, and femininity. Neuroticism and anxiety were assessed using a neuroticism score and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Depressive symptoms were questioned directly. Social adjustment was assessed by changes in working capacity or work status, leisure activity, marital relationship, and sexual activity. Results. Seventy-four women participated. Adjustment problems did not occur in the majority of patients. Psychosocial adjustment was different for patients receiving different types of treatments. Improvement in feminism (P = 0.050) and neuroticism (P = 0.010) was observed for patients receiving chemotherapy and deterioration was observed in patients treated with surgery. Deterioration in neuroticism was associated with lower education level (P = 0.032). With religious belief, there was better family support and more significant improvement in social activity (P = 0.038). Conclusion. Most patients adapted well. Patients at risk for psychosocial maladjustment include those who are treated surgically, less educated, and without religious belief. © 2001 Academic Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ygynoen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGynecologic Oncologyen_HK
dc.subjectFemaleen_HK
dc.subjectGynecologic canceren_HK
dc.subjectLongitudinalen_HK
dc.subjectPsychosocial adjustmenten_HK
dc.subjectRisk factorsen_HK
dc.titlePsychosocial adjustment in gynecologic cancer survivors: A longitudinal study on risk factors for maladjustmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0090-8258&volume=80&spage=387&epage=394&date=2001&atitle=Psychosocial+adjustment+in+Gynecologic+cancer+survivors:+a+longitudinal+study+on+risk+factors+for+maladjustmenten_HK
dc.identifier.emailNgan, HYS: hysngan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTang, GWK: gwktang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, HYS=rp00346en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTang, GWK=rp00328en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1006/gyno.2000.6093en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11263937-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035095368en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros57425en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035095368&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume80en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage387en_HK
dc.identifier.epage394en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167422500011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YM=7403676661en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, HYS=34571944100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, BYG=15767862000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, OWK=36907249300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, GWK=7401633864en_HK

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