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Article: Impact of obesity and body fat distribution on cardiovascular risk factors in Hong Kong Chinese

TitleImpact of obesity and body fat distribution on cardiovascular risk factors in Hong Kong Chinese
Authors
KeywordsBlood pressure
Cardiovascular disease
Insulin resistance
Lipids
Metabolic syndrome
Issue Date2004
PublisherNorth American Association for the Study of Obesity. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.obesityresearch.org
Citation
Obesity Research, 2004, v. 12 n. 11, p. 1805-1813 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Body fat distribution has been reported to differentially contribute to the development of cardiovascular risk. We report the relative associations between general and central obesity and risk factors in 2893 Chinese subjects recruited from the Hong Kong population. Research Methods and Procedures: Anthropometric parameters [waist circumference (WC) and BMI], surrogate measures of insulin resistance (fasting plasma glucose and insulin, oral glucose tolerance test, 2 hours glucose and insulin), fasting lipids (total, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein- cholesterol, and triglycerides) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured. General obesity was classified as BMI ≥25.0 kg/m 2 and central obesity as a WC ≥80 or ≥90 cm in women and men, respectively. Results: A total of 39.2% of the population was found to be obese. Obesity per se increased the levels of the risk factors, but central adiposity contributed to a greater extent to adverse high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglyceride, and insulin resistance levels. There was a continuous relationship between increasing obesity, both general and central, and cardiovascular risk, with lowest risk associated with the lowest indices of obesity. In the 1759 nonobese subjects divided into quartiles of BMI or WC, the levels of the cardiovascular risk factors still significantly increased with increasing quartiles of adiposity. Discussion: Central adiposity appears to contribute to a greater extent than general adiposity to the development of cardiovascular risk in this population. The relationship between obesity parameters and risk is a continuum, with risk factors significantly increasing even at levels usually considered nonobese. These observations support the proposed redefinition of overweight and obesity in Asian populations using lower cut-off points. Copyright © 2004 NAASO.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86561
ISSN
2007 Impact Factor: 4.953
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTai, HLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:18:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:18:33Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationObesity Research, 2004, v. 12 n. 11, p. 1805-1813en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1071-7323en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86561-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Body fat distribution has been reported to differentially contribute to the development of cardiovascular risk. We report the relative associations between general and central obesity and risk factors in 2893 Chinese subjects recruited from the Hong Kong population. Research Methods and Procedures: Anthropometric parameters [waist circumference (WC) and BMI], surrogate measures of insulin resistance (fasting plasma glucose and insulin, oral glucose tolerance test, 2 hours glucose and insulin), fasting lipids (total, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein- cholesterol, and triglycerides) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured. General obesity was classified as BMI ≥25.0 kg/m 2 and central obesity as a WC ≥80 or ≥90 cm in women and men, respectively. Results: A total of 39.2% of the population was found to be obese. Obesity per se increased the levels of the risk factors, but central adiposity contributed to a greater extent to adverse high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglyceride, and insulin resistance levels. There was a continuous relationship between increasing obesity, both general and central, and cardiovascular risk, with lowest risk associated with the lowest indices of obesity. In the 1759 nonobese subjects divided into quartiles of BMI or WC, the levels of the cardiovascular risk factors still significantly increased with increasing quartiles of adiposity. Discussion: Central adiposity appears to contribute to a greater extent than general adiposity to the development of cardiovascular risk in this population. The relationship between obesity parameters and risk is a continuum, with risk factors significantly increasing even at levels usually considered nonobese. These observations support the proposed redefinition of overweight and obesity in Asian populations using lower cut-off points. Copyright © 2004 NAASO.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNorth American Association for the Study of Obesity. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.obesityresearch.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofObesity Researchen_HK
dc.subjectBlood pressureen_HK
dc.subjectCardiovascular diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectInsulin resistanceen_HK
dc.subjectLipidsen_HK
dc.subjectMetabolic syndromeen_HK
dc.titleImpact of obesity and body fat distribution on cardiovascular risk factors in Hong Kong Chineseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1071-7323&volume=12&issue=11&spage=1805&epage=1813&date=2004&atitle=Impact+of+obesity+and+body+fat+distribution+on+cardiovascular+risk+factors+in+Hong+Kong+Chineseen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL:ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/oby.2004.224-
dc.identifier.pmid15601976-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-16644399754en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros96791en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-16644399754&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1805en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1813en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225929400013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTai, HL=7201668640en_HK

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