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Article: Do Social Instituttions Matter to Markets in Transition? Investigating Consumer Sentiment in China

TitleDo Social Instituttions Matter to Markets in Transition? Investigating Consumer Sentiment in China
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherSaint Louis University, John Cook School of Business. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.slu.edu/x17154.xml
Citation
Multinational Business Review, 2006, v. 14 n. 2, p. 47-66 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study assesses the impacts of the social institutions of a transitional economy on its market by examining how China’s political, economic and cultural institutions influence consumers’ sentiment and their purchase planning behaviors. We propose and empirically validate a four‐factor model of consumer sentiment that captures the impacts of these powerful social institutions. The validity of the model was supported with data from a multi‐level stratified survey that involved 9 cities and 3,960 consumers across a number of product categories. Our findings confirm the salience of social institutions in affecting consumers’ sentiment as well as their consumption behaviors in China.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85857
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.207

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYim, BCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHung, KHKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, J.Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:10:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:10:03Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMultinational Business Review, 2006, v. 14 n. 2, p. 47-66en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1525-383Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85857-
dc.description.abstractThis study assesses the impacts of the social institutions of a transitional economy on its market by examining how China’s political, economic and cultural institutions influence consumers’ sentiment and their purchase planning behaviors. We propose and empirically validate a four‐factor model of consumer sentiment that captures the impacts of these powerful social institutions. The validity of the model was supported with data from a multi‐level stratified survey that involved 9 cities and 3,960 consumers across a number of product categories. Our findings confirm the salience of social institutions in affecting consumers’ sentiment as well as their consumption behaviors in China.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSaint Louis University, John Cook School of Business. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.slu.edu/x17154.xmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMultinational Business Reviewen_HK
dc.titleDo Social Instituttions Matter to Markets in Transition? Investigating Consumer Sentiment in Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1525-383X&volume=14&issue=2&spage=47&epage=66&date=2006&atitle=Do+Social+Instituttions+Matter+to+Markets+in+Transition?+Investigationg+Consumer+Sentiment+in+China%27en_HK
dc.identifier.emailYim, BCK: yim@business.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHung, KHK: kineta@business.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYim, BCK=rp01122en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/1525383X200600008-
dc.identifier.doiSocial institutions, China, Consumer sentiment, Consumer behaviour-
dc.identifier.hkuros113041en_HK

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