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Article: The influence of technical complications on postoperative outcome and survival after esophagectomy

TitleThe influence of technical complications on postoperative outcome and survival after esophagectomy
Authors
KeywordsComplications
Esophageal cancer
Mortality
Survival
Issue Date2006
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annalssurgicaloncology.org
Citation
Annals Of Surgical Oncology, 2006, v. 13 n. 4, p. 557-564 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The dismal survival associated with esophagectomy for cancer has led to the search for potentially correctable factors responsible for this poor prognosis. Although it is intuitive that technical complications could increase postoperative mortality, the effect on long-term survival is controversial. Methods: From 1990 to 2002, 434 patients underwent resection for squamous cell carcinoma of the intrathoracic esophagus. Prospectively collected data were reviewed for the presence of technical complications. Patient, tumor, and operative variables, postoperative outcome, and survival were compared between patients with technical complications and those without. Prognostic factors were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results: Technical complications occurred in 98 (22.6%) patients. Patients with technical complications had a higher prevalence of cardiac disease, more proximal tumors, and more cervical anastomoses. Technical complications were associated with an increased rate of pulmonary complications (37.8% vs. 10.7%; P < .001) and increased hospital mortality (9.2% vs. 3.3%; P = .025), but no difference in 30-day mortality (2% vs. 1.2%; P = .6). Poor-prognostic factors for survival included male sex, stage III/IV disease, cirrhosis, proximal tumors, and R1/R2 resection, but not technical complications. Conclusions: Although immediate postoperative outcome and hospital mortality rates were increased, no effect on long-term survival was seen in patients with complications related to errors in surgical technique. © 2006 The Society of Surgical Oncology, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84464
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.655
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.902
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFerri, LEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwok, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:53:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:53:16Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Surgical Oncology, 2006, v. 13 n. 4, p. 557-564en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1068-9265en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/84464-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The dismal survival associated with esophagectomy for cancer has led to the search for potentially correctable factors responsible for this poor prognosis. Although it is intuitive that technical complications could increase postoperative mortality, the effect on long-term survival is controversial. Methods: From 1990 to 2002, 434 patients underwent resection for squamous cell carcinoma of the intrathoracic esophagus. Prospectively collected data were reviewed for the presence of technical complications. Patient, tumor, and operative variables, postoperative outcome, and survival were compared between patients with technical complications and those without. Prognostic factors were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results: Technical complications occurred in 98 (22.6%) patients. Patients with technical complications had a higher prevalence of cardiac disease, more proximal tumors, and more cervical anastomoses. Technical complications were associated with an increased rate of pulmonary complications (37.8% vs. 10.7%; P < .001) and increased hospital mortality (9.2% vs. 3.3%; P = .025), but no difference in 30-day mortality (2% vs. 1.2%; P = .6). Poor-prognostic factors for survival included male sex, stage III/IV disease, cirrhosis, proximal tumors, and R1/R2 resection, but not technical complications. Conclusions: Although immediate postoperative outcome and hospital mortality rates were increased, no effect on long-term survival was seen in patients with complications related to errors in surgical technique. © 2006 The Society of Surgical Oncology, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annalssurgicaloncology.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Surgical Oncologyen_HK
dc.subjectComplicationsen_HK
dc.subjectEsophageal canceren_HK
dc.subjectMortalityen_HK
dc.subjectSurvivalen_HK
dc.titleThe influence of technical complications on postoperative outcome and survival after esophagectomyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1068-9265&volume=13&issue=4&spage=557&epage=564&date=2006&atitle=The+influence+of+technical+complications+on+postoperative+outcome+and+survival+after+esophagectomyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, S: slaw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, J: jwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, S=rp00437en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, J=rp00322en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1245/ASO.2006.04.040en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16485146-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644976522en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros114529en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644976522&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage557en_HK
dc.identifier.epage564en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236031700019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFerri, LE=7003538053en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, S=7202241293en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KH=36485841700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, KF=7102194177en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, J=8049324500en_HK

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