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Article: Esophageal cancers with synchronous or antecedent head and neck cancers: A more formidable challenge?

TitleEsophageal cancers with synchronous or antecedent head and neck cancers: A more formidable challenge?
Authors
KeywordsEsophageal cancer
Head and neck cancer
Morbidity
Mortality
Postoperative complication
Synchronous or antecedent cancers
Issue Date2008
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annalssurgicaloncology.org
Citation
Annals Of Surgical Oncology, 2008, v. 15 n. 6, p. 1750-1756 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The presence of synchronous or antecedent head and neck cancers may complicate management of patients with primary esophageal cancer. Methods: From January 1982 to December 2004, by means of a prospectively collected database, we compared information from 119 patients with esophageal cancers who had synchronous or antecedent head and neck cancers with information from 1555 patients who only had squamous cell esophageal cancer in a tertiary referral academic hospital. Results: There were far more men and younger patients in those who had head and neck cancers, and multicentric tumors were also more common. Hypopharyngeal tumors were the most frequently encountered head and neck cancer and were found in 36.1% of patients. Resection rates of the primary esophageal cancers were similar in those who had head and neck cancers and in those who only had esophageal cancer (60.7% vs. 61.7% P = .74). Overall postoperative complication rates were not different. Thirty-day mortality rates were 0% and 2.9% for those who did and did not have head and neck tumors, respectively (P = .25). The respective hospital mortality rates were 10.3% and 9.5% (P = .83). Median survival for resectable esophageal cancers was 9.2 months for the former group and 13.4 months for the latter (P = .02). Conclusions: Esophagectomy rates did not differ when synchronous or antecedent head and neck cancers were present. Similar postoperative morbidity and mortality rates could be achieved. The presence of additional head and neck tumors imparted a worse long-term prognosis. © 2008 Society of Surgical Oncology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83735
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.655
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.902
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, OSHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTong, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:44:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:44:35Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Surgical Oncology, 2008, v. 15 n. 6, p. 1750-1756en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1068-9265en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/83735-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The presence of synchronous or antecedent head and neck cancers may complicate management of patients with primary esophageal cancer. Methods: From January 1982 to December 2004, by means of a prospectively collected database, we compared information from 119 patients with esophageal cancers who had synchronous or antecedent head and neck cancers with information from 1555 patients who only had squamous cell esophageal cancer in a tertiary referral academic hospital. Results: There were far more men and younger patients in those who had head and neck cancers, and multicentric tumors were also more common. Hypopharyngeal tumors were the most frequently encountered head and neck cancer and were found in 36.1% of patients. Resection rates of the primary esophageal cancers were similar in those who had head and neck cancers and in those who only had esophageal cancer (60.7% vs. 61.7% P = .74). Overall postoperative complication rates were not different. Thirty-day mortality rates were 0% and 2.9% for those who did and did not have head and neck tumors, respectively (P = .25). The respective hospital mortality rates were 10.3% and 9.5% (P = .83). Median survival for resectable esophageal cancers was 9.2 months for the former group and 13.4 months for the latter (P = .02). Conclusions: Esophagectomy rates did not differ when synchronous or antecedent head and neck cancers were present. Similar postoperative morbidity and mortality rates could be achieved. The presence of additional head and neck tumors imparted a worse long-term prognosis. © 2008 Society of Surgical Oncology.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annalssurgicaloncology.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Surgical Oncologyen_HK
dc.subjectEsophageal canceren_HK
dc.subjectHead and neck canceren_HK
dc.subjectMorbidityen_HK
dc.subjectMortalityen_HK
dc.subjectPostoperative complicationen_HK
dc.subjectSynchronous or antecedent cancersen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Squamous Cell - complications - mortality - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEsophageal Neoplasms - complications - mortality - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEsophagectomyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHead and Neck Neoplasms - complications - mortality - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Multiple Primary - mortality - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Second Primary - mortality - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_HK
dc.titleEsophageal cancers with synchronous or antecedent head and neck cancers: A more formidable challenge?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1068-9265&volume=15&issue=6&spage=1750&epage=1756&date=2008&atitle=Esophageal+cancers+with+synchronous+or+antecedent+head+and+neck+cancers:+a+more+formidable+challenge?en_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, S: slaw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, J: jwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, S=rp00437en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, J=rp00322en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1245/s10434-008-9860-yen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18347873-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-43449106462en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros142140en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-43449106462&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1750en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1756en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1534-4681-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000255741500028-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, OSH=6508168045en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, S=7202241293en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, WM=7401613513en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KH=36485841700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, KH=23974908800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, J=8049324500en_HK

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