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Article: Detection of non-adherent behaviour in early psychosis

TitleDetection of non-adherent behaviour in early psychosis
Authors
KeywordsCompliance
Early psychosis
Medication adherence
Schizophrenia
Issue Date2006
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anp
Citation
Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Psychiatry, 2006, v. 40 n. 5, p. 446-451 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Adherence to antipsychotic treatment is an important aspect of the long-term management of schizophrenia. The evaluation of adherence is often difficult in the clinical setting. This study compared patient self-reporting and clinician judgment of adherence behaviour in patients with early and chronic schizophrenia. Method: Clinician-rated questionnaires and parallel patient self-rated questionnaires were administered to 229 patients with early schizophrenia (illness duration < 5 years) and 255 patients with chronic schizophrenia. Items in the questionnaires addressed two forms of adherence behaviour (forgetting to take medication and deciding to stop medication) as well as attitudes toward medication. Results: Significant non-adherent behaviour was reported by patients, particularly in the early schizophrenia group. Non-adherent behaviour was related to feelings of embarrassment about taking medication. Both non-adherence and embarrassment were under-recognized by clinicians. Starting from a prior probability of 0.24, knowledge of the patients' attitudes increased the posterior probability to 0.33, whereas clinicians' detection of non-adherence (deciding to stop medication) improved the posterior probability to 0.65. When both clinicians' evaluations and patients' attitudes were known, the posterior probability improved to 0.68. Conclusion: Non-adherence is a widespread phenomenon in early schizophrenia. Increasing clinicians' sensitivity to patients' feelings of embarrassment may be an important factor in the detection of non-adherence. When taking a base rate of non-adherence into consideration, clinicians' evaluations appeared to be more effective in detecting non-adherence than simple information obtained from patients on their attitudes toward medication. Pragmatic real-life estimation of non-adherence has important implications for the possibility of intervention. © 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2006 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81502
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.536
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.269
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKan, CSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, CPYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:18:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:18:32Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAustralian And New Zealand Journal Of Psychiatry, 2006, v. 40 n. 5, p. 446-451en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81502-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Adherence to antipsychotic treatment is an important aspect of the long-term management of schizophrenia. The evaluation of adherence is often difficult in the clinical setting. This study compared patient self-reporting and clinician judgment of adherence behaviour in patients with early and chronic schizophrenia. Method: Clinician-rated questionnaires and parallel patient self-rated questionnaires were administered to 229 patients with early schizophrenia (illness duration < 5 years) and 255 patients with chronic schizophrenia. Items in the questionnaires addressed two forms of adherence behaviour (forgetting to take medication and deciding to stop medication) as well as attitudes toward medication. Results: Significant non-adherent behaviour was reported by patients, particularly in the early schizophrenia group. Non-adherent behaviour was related to feelings of embarrassment about taking medication. Both non-adherence and embarrassment were under-recognized by clinicians. Starting from a prior probability of 0.24, knowledge of the patients' attitudes increased the posterior probability to 0.33, whereas clinicians' detection of non-adherence (deciding to stop medication) improved the posterior probability to 0.65. When both clinicians' evaluations and patients' attitudes were known, the posterior probability improved to 0.68. Conclusion: Non-adherence is a widespread phenomenon in early schizophrenia. Increasing clinicians' sensitivity to patients' feelings of embarrassment may be an important factor in the detection of non-adherence. When taking a base rate of non-adherence into consideration, clinicians' evaluations appeared to be more effective in detecting non-adherence than simple information obtained from patients on their attitudes toward medication. Pragmatic real-life estimation of non-adherence has important implications for the possibility of intervention. © 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2006 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anpen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatryen_HK
dc.subjectComplianceen_HK
dc.subjectEarly psychosisen_HK
dc.subjectMedication adherenceen_HK
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_HK
dc.titleDetection of non-adherent behaviour in early psychosisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0004-8674&volume=40&spage=446&epage=451&date=2005&atitle=Detection+of+non-adherent+behavior+in+early+psychosisen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiu, CPY: chiupyc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, CPY=rp00291en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1614.2006.01821.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16683971-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646200237en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros111163en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646200237&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage446en_HK
dc.identifier.epage451en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237178300011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, CLM=35734149500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, EYH=7402315729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKan, CS=7102156197en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, KC=28168097100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, CW=8627115600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, CPY=8627115700en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike606511-

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