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Article: Prevalence, course, and risk factors for antenatal anxiety and depression

TitlePrevalence, course, and risk factors for antenatal anxiety and depression
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.greenjournal.org
Citation
Obstetrics And Gynecology, 2007, v. 110 n. 5, p. 1102-1112 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence and course of antenatal anxiety and depression across different stages of pregnancy, risk factors at each stage, and the relationship between antenatal anxiety and depression and postpartum depression. METHODS: A consecutive sample of 357 pregnant women in an antenatal clinic in a regional hospital was assessed longitudinally at four stages of pregnancy: first trimester, second trimester, third trimester, and 6 weeks postpartum. The antenatal questionnaire assessed anxiety and depression (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and demographic and psychosocial risk factors. The postpartum questionnaire assessed postpartum depression with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. RESULTS: More than one half (54%) and more than one third (37.1%) of the women had antenatal anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively, in at least one antenatal assessment. Anxiety was more prevalent than depression at all stages. A mixed-effects model showed that both conditions had a nonlinear changing course (P<.05 for both), with both being more prevalent and severe in the first and third trimesters. Risk factors were slightly different at different stages. Both antenatal anxiety (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.66, P=.004 in the first trimester; adjusted OR 3.65, P<.001 in the second trimester; adjusted OR 3.84, P<.001 in the third trimester) and depression (adjusted OR 4.16, P<.001 in the first trimester; adjusted OR 3.35, P=.001 in the second trimester; adjusted OR 2.67, P=.009 in the third trimester) increased the risk of postpartum depression. CONCLUSION: Antenatal anxiety and depression are prevalent and serious problems with changing courses. Continuous assessment over the course of pregnancy is warranted. Identifying and treating these problems is important in preventing postpartum depression. © 2007 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81474
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.656
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.899
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSze Mun Lau, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChong, CSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChui, HWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:18:12Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:18:12Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationObstetrics And Gynecology, 2007, v. 110 n. 5, p. 1102-1112en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0029-7844en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81474-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence and course of antenatal anxiety and depression across different stages of pregnancy, risk factors at each stage, and the relationship between antenatal anxiety and depression and postpartum depression. METHODS: A consecutive sample of 357 pregnant women in an antenatal clinic in a regional hospital was assessed longitudinally at four stages of pregnancy: first trimester, second trimester, third trimester, and 6 weeks postpartum. The antenatal questionnaire assessed anxiety and depression (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and demographic and psychosocial risk factors. The postpartum questionnaire assessed postpartum depression with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. RESULTS: More than one half (54%) and more than one third (37.1%) of the women had antenatal anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively, in at least one antenatal assessment. Anxiety was more prevalent than depression at all stages. A mixed-effects model showed that both conditions had a nonlinear changing course (P<.05 for both), with both being more prevalent and severe in the first and third trimesters. Risk factors were slightly different at different stages. Both antenatal anxiety (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.66, P=.004 in the first trimester; adjusted OR 3.65, P<.001 in the second trimester; adjusted OR 3.84, P<.001 in the third trimester) and depression (adjusted OR 4.16, P<.001 in the first trimester; adjusted OR 3.35, P=.001 in the second trimester; adjusted OR 2.67, P=.009 in the third trimester) increased the risk of postpartum depression. CONCLUSION: Antenatal anxiety and depression are prevalent and serious problems with changing courses. Continuous assessment over the course of pregnancy is warranted. Identifying and treating these problems is important in preventing postpartum depression. © 2007 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.greenjournal.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofObstetrics and Gynecologyen_HK
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in (provide complete journal citation)en_HK
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshDepression - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshDepression, Postpartum - etiology-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications - epidemiology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Diagnosis - psychology-
dc.titlePrevalence, course, and risk factors for antenatal anxiety and depressionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0029-7844&volume=110 &issue=5&spage=1102&epage=1112&date=2007&atitle=Prevalence,+course,+and+risk+factors+of+antenatal+anxiety+and+depressionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, AM: amlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AM=rp00483en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.AOG.0000287065.59491.70en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17978126-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35848953402en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros137321en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros242859-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35848953402&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume110en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1102en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1112en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250360800023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, AM=7405629831en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SK=36854227400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSze Mun Lau, SM=22956726700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChong, CSY=25629318300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChui, HW=22955167800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, DYT=35261710300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8198013-

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