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Article: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-like virus in Chinese horseshoe bats
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TitleSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-like virus in Chinese horseshoe bats
 
AuthorsLau, SKP1
Woo, PCY1
Li, KSM1
Huang, Y1
Tsoi, HW1
Wong, BHL1
Wong, SSY1
Leung, SY1
Chan, KH1
Yuen, KY1
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
 
CitationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2005, v. 102 n. 39, p. 14040-14045 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0506735102
 
AbstractAlthough the finding of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in caged palm civets from live animal markets in China has provided evidence for interspecies transmission in the genesis of the SARS epidemic, subsequent studies suggested that the civet may have served only as an amplification host for SARS-CoV. In a surveillance study for CoV in noncaged animals from the wild areas of the Hong Kong Special Administration Region, we identified a CoV closely related to SARS-CoV (bat-SARS-CoV) from 23 (39%) of 59 anal swabs of wild Chinese horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus sinicus) by using RT-PCR. Sequencing and analysis of three bat-SARS-CoV genomes from samples collected at different dates showed that bat-SARS-CoV is closely related to SARS-CoV from humans and civets. Phylogenetic analysis showed that bat-SARS-CoV formed a distinct cluster with SARS-CoV as group 2b CoV, distantly related to known group 2 CoV. Most differences between the bat-SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV genomes were observed in the spike genes, ORF 3 and ORF 8, which are the regions where most variations also were observed between human and civet SARS-CoV genomes. In addition, the presence of a 29-bp insertion in ORF 8 of bat-SARS-CoV genome, not in most human SARS-CoV genomes, suggests that it has a common ancestor with civet SARS-CoV. Antibody against recombinant bat-SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein was detected in 84% of Chinese horse-shoe bats by using an enzyme immunoassay. Neutralizing antibody to human SARS-CoV also was detected in bats with lower viral loads. Precautions should be exercised in the handling of these animals. © 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
 
ISSN0027-8424
2013 Impact Factor: 9.809
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0506735102
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000232231900059
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, KSM
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorTsoi, HW
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, BHL
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSY
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:48:19Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:48:19Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractAlthough the finding of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in caged palm civets from live animal markets in China has provided evidence for interspecies transmission in the genesis of the SARS epidemic, subsequent studies suggested that the civet may have served only as an amplification host for SARS-CoV. In a surveillance study for CoV in noncaged animals from the wild areas of the Hong Kong Special Administration Region, we identified a CoV closely related to SARS-CoV (bat-SARS-CoV) from 23 (39%) of 59 anal swabs of wild Chinese horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus sinicus) by using RT-PCR. Sequencing and analysis of three bat-SARS-CoV genomes from samples collected at different dates showed that bat-SARS-CoV is closely related to SARS-CoV from humans and civets. Phylogenetic analysis showed that bat-SARS-CoV formed a distinct cluster with SARS-CoV as group 2b CoV, distantly related to known group 2 CoV. Most differences between the bat-SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV genomes were observed in the spike genes, ORF 3 and ORF 8, which are the regions where most variations also were observed between human and civet SARS-CoV genomes. In addition, the presence of a 29-bp insertion in ORF 8 of bat-SARS-CoV genome, not in most human SARS-CoV genomes, suggests that it has a common ancestor with civet SARS-CoV. Antibody against recombinant bat-SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein was detected in 84% of Chinese horse-shoe bats by using an enzyme immunoassay. Neutralizing antibody to human SARS-CoV also was detected in bats with lower viral loads. Precautions should be exercised in the handling of these animals. © 2005 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2005, v. 102 n. 39, p. 14040-14045 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0506735102
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0506735102
 
dc.identifier.epage14045
 
dc.identifier.hkuros118584
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000232231900059
 
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
2013 Impact Factor: 9.809
 
dc.identifier.issue39
 
dc.identifier.pmid16169905
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-25444531712
 
dc.identifier.spage14040
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78913
 
dc.identifier.volume102
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAmino Acid Sequence
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshBase Sequence
 
dc.subject.meshChiroptera - virology
 
dc.subject.meshGenome, Viral
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong
 
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Data
 
dc.subject.meshPhylogeny
 
dc.subject.meshSARS Virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
 
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, DNA
 
dc.subject.meshViral Proteins - blood - genetics
 
dc.titleSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-like virus in Chinese horseshoe bats
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong