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Article: Prevalence, Treatment, and Control of Diagnosed Diabetes in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004
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TitlePrevalence, Treatment, and Control of Diagnosed Diabetes in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004
 
AuthorsOng, KL1
Cheung, BMY1
Wong, LYF1
Wat, NMS1
Tan, KCB1
Lam, KSL1
 
KeywordsBlood Pressure
Diabetes Mellitus
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Prevalence
Total Cholesterol
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidem
 
CitationAnnals Of Epidemiology, 2008, v. 18 n. 3, p. 222-229 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2007.10.007
 
AbstractPurpose: This study aimed to examine the trends in prevalence, treatment, and control of diagnosed diabetes in United States adults 20 years of age or older. Methods: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 were used. Glycemic, blood pressure, and total cholesterol target levels were defined as having glycosylated hemoglobin <7.0%, blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg, and total cholesterol <200 mg/dL, respectively. Results: The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was 7.8% in 2003-2004 and increased significantly in people aged 40-59 years, women, non-Hispanic whites, and obese people in the period 1999-2004. Although there was no significant change in the pattern of antidiabetic treatment, the age-adjusted percentage of people with diagnosed diabetes achieving glycemic and blood pressure target levels increased from 35.8% to 57.1% (p = 0.002) and from 35.7% to 48.3% (p = 0.04), respectively. However, there were only insignificant increases in percentages of those persons achieving total cholesterol target level (from 48.8% to 50.4%) and those achieving all 3 target levels (from 7.5% to 13.2%). Conclusions: In 1999-2004, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes increased significantly in some subgroups of the population. However, the increases in percentages of people with diabetes achieving glycemic and blood pressure targets are encouraging, although there is room for improvement. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN1047-2797
2013 Impact Factor: 2.145
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.301
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2007.10.007
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000253699100008
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorOng, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, LYF
 
dc.contributor.authorWat, NMS
 
dc.contributor.authorTan, KCB
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSL
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:44:23Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:44:23Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study aimed to examine the trends in prevalence, treatment, and control of diagnosed diabetes in United States adults 20 years of age or older. Methods: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 were used. Glycemic, blood pressure, and total cholesterol target levels were defined as having glycosylated hemoglobin <7.0%, blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg, and total cholesterol <200 mg/dL, respectively. Results: The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was 7.8% in 2003-2004 and increased significantly in people aged 40-59 years, women, non-Hispanic whites, and obese people in the period 1999-2004. Although there was no significant change in the pattern of antidiabetic treatment, the age-adjusted percentage of people with diagnosed diabetes achieving glycemic and blood pressure target levels increased from 35.8% to 57.1% (p = 0.002) and from 35.7% to 48.3% (p = 0.04), respectively. However, there were only insignificant increases in percentages of those persons achieving total cholesterol target level (from 48.8% to 50.4%) and those achieving all 3 target levels (from 7.5% to 13.2%). Conclusions: In 1999-2004, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes increased significantly in some subgroups of the population. However, the increases in percentages of people with diabetes achieving glycemic and blood pressure targets are encouraging, although there is room for improvement. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Epidemiology, 2008, v. 18 n. 3, p. 222-229 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2007.10.007
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8302963
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2007.10.007
 
dc.identifier.epage229
 
dc.identifier.hkuros142250
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253699100008
 
dc.identifier.issn1047-2797
2013 Impact Factor: 2.145
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.301
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid18201902
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-39149145482
 
dc.identifier.spage222
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78575
 
dc.identifier.volume18
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidem
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Epidemiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsAnnals of Epidemiology. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - ethnology - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshNutrition Surveys
 
dc.subject.meshPrevalence
 
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysis
 
dc.subject.meshUnited States - epidemiology
 
dc.subjectBlood Pressure
 
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitus
 
dc.subjectGlycosylated Hemoglobin A
 
dc.subjectPrevalence
 
dc.subjectTotal Cholesterol
 
dc.titlePrevalence, Treatment, and Control of Diagnosed Diabetes in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong