File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Gender difference in blood pressure control and cardiovascular risk factors in Americans with diagnosed hypertension

TitleGender difference in blood pressure control and cardiovascular risk factors in Americans with diagnosed hypertension
Authors
KeywordsCardiovascular risk factors
Control
Gender difference
Hypertension
United States
Issue Date2008
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://hyper.ahajournals.org/
Citation
Hypertension, 2008, v. 51 n. 4 PART 2 SUPPL., p. 1142-1148 How to Cite?
AbstractHypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in women. We, therefore, analyzed gender-specific trends in the control of blood pressure and prevalence of 5 other cardiovascular risk factors (central obesity, elevated total cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hyperglycemia, and smoking) among adults with diagnosed hypertension in the United States. We included 3475 participants aged ≥18 years with diagnosed hypertension in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. The age-adjusted prevalence of uncontrolled blood pressure was 50.8±2.1% in men and 55.9±1.5% in women, which were not significantly different and had not changed significantly with time. Central obesity, elevated total cholesterol level, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly more prevalent in women than in men (79.0±1.0%, 61.3±1.6%, and 39.7±1.6% versus 63.9±1.6%, 48.1±1.8%, and 35.6±1.7%, respectively; P<0.05). The age-adjusted proportion with ≥3 of the 6 risk factors studied was higher in women than in men (52.5±1.4% versus 40.9±1.8%; P<0.001), and this proportion decreased significantly by 7.7% in women from 1999-2000 to 2003-2004 (P<0.05) but not in men. Our study shows that blood pressure control in women with diagnosed hypertension was not significantly inferior compared with men and had not changed significantly in 1999-2004. However, women had higher prevalence of other concomitant cardiovascular risk factors. Although there is room for improvement in blood pressure control, our study has highlighted the importance of addressing concomitant cardiovascular risk factors in women with hypertension. © 2008 American Heart Association, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78551
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.294
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.702
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOng, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:44:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:44:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHypertension, 2008, v. 51 n. 4 PART 2 SUPPL., p. 1142-1148en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0194-911Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78551-
dc.description.abstractHypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in women. We, therefore, analyzed gender-specific trends in the control of blood pressure and prevalence of 5 other cardiovascular risk factors (central obesity, elevated total cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hyperglycemia, and smoking) among adults with diagnosed hypertension in the United States. We included 3475 participants aged ≥18 years with diagnosed hypertension in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. The age-adjusted prevalence of uncontrolled blood pressure was 50.8±2.1% in men and 55.9±1.5% in women, which were not significantly different and had not changed significantly with time. Central obesity, elevated total cholesterol level, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly more prevalent in women than in men (79.0±1.0%, 61.3±1.6%, and 39.7±1.6% versus 63.9±1.6%, 48.1±1.8%, and 35.6±1.7%, respectively; P<0.05). The age-adjusted proportion with ≥3 of the 6 risk factors studied was higher in women than in men (52.5±1.4% versus 40.9±1.8%; P<0.001), and this proportion decreased significantly by 7.7% in women from 1999-2000 to 2003-2004 (P<0.05) but not in men. Our study shows that blood pressure control in women with diagnosed hypertension was not significantly inferior compared with men and had not changed significantly in 1999-2004. However, women had higher prevalence of other concomitant cardiovascular risk factors. Although there is room for improvement in blood pressure control, our study has highlighted the importance of addressing concomitant cardiovascular risk factors in women with hypertension. © 2008 American Heart Association, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://hyper.ahajournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHypertensionen_HK
dc.subjectCardiovascular risk factorsen_HK
dc.subjectControlen_HK
dc.subjectGender differenceen_HK
dc.subjectHypertensionen_HK
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure-
dc.subject.meshHypertension - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, HDL/blood-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.titleGender difference in blood pressure control and cardiovascular risk factors in Americans with diagnosed hypertensionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0143-117X&volume=51&spage=1142&epage=8&date=2008&atitle=Gender+difference+in+blood+pressure+control+and+cardiovascular+risk+factors+in+Americans+with+diagnosed+hypertensionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTso, AWK: awk.tso@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTso, AWK=rp00535en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.107.105205en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18259031-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-40849138013en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros142247en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-40849138013&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume51en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4 PART 2 SUPPL.en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1142en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1148en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000254161300059-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOng, KL=8340854000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTso, AWK=6701371436en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats