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Article: Molecular tracing of the global hepatitis C virus epidemic predicts regional patterns of hepatocellular carcinoma mortality

TitleMolecular tracing of the global hepatitis C virus epidemic predicts regional patterns of hepatocellular carcinoma mortality
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
Gastroenterology, 2006, v. 130 n. 3, p. 703-714 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground & Aims: Molecular evolutionary analysis based on coalescent theory can provide important insights into epidemiologic processes worldwide. This approach was combined with analyses of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemiologic-historical background and HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in different countries. Methods: The HCV gene sequences of 131 genotype 1b (HCV-1b) strains from Japan, 38 HCV-1a strains from the United States, 33 HCV-1b strains from Spain, 27 HCV-3a strains from the former Soviet Union (FSU), 47 HCV-4a strains from Egypt, 25 HCV-5a strains from South Africa, and 24 HCV-6a strains from Hong Kong isolated in this study and previous studies were analyzed. Results: The coalescent analysis indicated that a transition from constant size to rapid exponential growth (spread time) occurred in Japan in the 1920s (HCV-1b), but not until the 1940s for the same genotype in Spain and other European countries. The spread time of HCV-1a in the United States was estimated to be in the 1960s; HCV-3a in the FSU, HCV-5a in South Africa, and HCV-6a in Hong Kong in the 1960s, mid-1950s, and late 1970s, respectively. Three different linear progression curves were determined by analysis of the relationship between HCV seroprevalence and HCC mortality in different geographic regions; a steep ascent indicated the greatest progression to HCC in Japan, a near horizontal line indicated the least progression in the United States and the FSU, and an intermediate slope was observed in Europe. Conclusions: These findings strongly suggest that the initial spread time of HCV is associated with the progression dynamics of HCC in each area, irrespective of genotype. © 2006 by the American Gastroenterological Association Institute.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78373
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKurbanov, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMano, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOrito, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorVargas, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorEsteban, JIen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKramvis, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKew, MCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmuts, HEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNetesov, SVen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlter, HJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMizokami, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:42:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:42:09Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterology, 2006, v. 130 n. 3, p. 703-714en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78373-
dc.description.abstractBackground & Aims: Molecular evolutionary analysis based on coalescent theory can provide important insights into epidemiologic processes worldwide. This approach was combined with analyses of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemiologic-historical background and HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in different countries. Methods: The HCV gene sequences of 131 genotype 1b (HCV-1b) strains from Japan, 38 HCV-1a strains from the United States, 33 HCV-1b strains from Spain, 27 HCV-3a strains from the former Soviet Union (FSU), 47 HCV-4a strains from Egypt, 25 HCV-5a strains from South Africa, and 24 HCV-6a strains from Hong Kong isolated in this study and previous studies were analyzed. Results: The coalescent analysis indicated that a transition from constant size to rapid exponential growth (spread time) occurred in Japan in the 1920s (HCV-1b), but not until the 1940s for the same genotype in Spain and other European countries. The spread time of HCV-1a in the United States was estimated to be in the 1960s; HCV-3a in the FSU, HCV-5a in South Africa, and HCV-6a in Hong Kong in the 1960s, mid-1950s, and late 1970s, respectively. Three different linear progression curves were determined by analysis of the relationship between HCV seroprevalence and HCC mortality in different geographic regions; a steep ascent indicated the greatest progression to HCC in Japan, a near horizontal line indicated the least progression in the United States and the FSU, and an intermediate slope was observed in Europe. Conclusions: These findings strongly suggest that the initial spread time of HCV is associated with the progression dynamics of HCC in each area, irrespective of genotype. © 2006 by the American Gastroenterological Association Institute.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Hepatocellular - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Progressionen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHepacivirus - classification - isolation & purificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C - complications - epidemiology - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLiver Neoplasms - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.titleMolecular tracing of the global hepatitis C virus epidemic predicts regional patterns of hepatocellular carcinoma mortalityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0016-5085&volume=130&spage=703&epage=714&date=2006&atitle=Molecular+Tracing+of+the+Global+Hepatitis+C+Virus+Epidemic+Predicts+Regional+Patterns+of+Hepatocellular+Carcinoma+Mortalityen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, M:mfyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, C:hrmelcl@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, M=rp00479en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, C=rp00314en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1053/j.gastro.2006.01.032en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16530512-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644863680en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115270en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644863680&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume130en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage703en_HK
dc.identifier.epage714en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236210100014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTanaka, Y=7405315865en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKurbanov, F=7003649588en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMano, S=15071280100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOrito, E=7006161634en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVargas, V=7006210974en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEsteban, JI=7202332717en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, M=7102031955en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, C=7403086396en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKramvis, A=6603568484en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKew, MC=7102927763en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmuts, HE=6602748689en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNetesov, SV=7003838873en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlter, HJ=7102346556en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMizokami, M=7103318255en_HK

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