File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: LDL subfractions in acromegaly: Relation to growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I

TitleLDL subfractions in acromegaly: Relation to growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atherosclerosis
Citation
Atherosclerosis, 1997, v. 129 n. 1, p. 59-65 How to Cite?
AbstractAcromegaly is associated with changes in lipoprotein metabolism and an excess in cardiovascular mortality. We have examined low density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction distribution in 24 patients with active acromegaly and in controls matched for age, sex and body mass index. LDL was subfractionated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The concentration of small dense LDL-III was significantly higher in the acromegalic patients compared to the controls (94.2 + 44.9 versus 67.2 + 30.4 mg/dl, P < 0.05) and there was a concomitant reduction in the intermediate subfraction LDL-II (124.8 + 31.3 versus 149.9 + 30.0 mg/dl, P < 0.05). Univariate analysis showed that both growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I correlated with LDL-III and inversely with LDL-II. Acromegalic patients were found to have lower hepatic lipase (HL) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities than controls (HL: 13.29 + 6.56 versus 21.58 + 7.27 μmol FFA released/ml/h, P < 0.001; LPL: 7.22 + 3.04 versus 11.53 + 7.85 μmol FFA released/ml/h, P < 0.05) whereas plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity was significantly increased (8.15 ± 1.81 versus 5.54 ± 1.86 pmol/μl/h, P < 0.001). Both GH and IGF-I were significantly associated with HL, LPL and CETP activities. Multivariate analysis on this relatively small sample size showed that in normal subjects, triglyceride and HL activity were the major determinants of LDL-III. In contrast, GH and HDL were the main determinants in acromegaly, accounting for 32 and 24% in the variability of LDL-III respectively. In conclusion, GH excess has a direct effect on LDL subfraction distribution.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78271
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.942
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.819
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, KCBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShiu, SWMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:41:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:41:02Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAtherosclerosis, 1997, v. 129 n. 1, p. 59-65en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-9150en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78271-
dc.description.abstractAcromegaly is associated with changes in lipoprotein metabolism and an excess in cardiovascular mortality. We have examined low density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction distribution in 24 patients with active acromegaly and in controls matched for age, sex and body mass index. LDL was subfractionated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The concentration of small dense LDL-III was significantly higher in the acromegalic patients compared to the controls (94.2 + 44.9 versus 67.2 + 30.4 mg/dl, P < 0.05) and there was a concomitant reduction in the intermediate subfraction LDL-II (124.8 + 31.3 versus 149.9 + 30.0 mg/dl, P < 0.05). Univariate analysis showed that both growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I correlated with LDL-III and inversely with LDL-II. Acromegalic patients were found to have lower hepatic lipase (HL) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities than controls (HL: 13.29 + 6.56 versus 21.58 + 7.27 μmol FFA released/ml/h, P < 0.001; LPL: 7.22 + 3.04 versus 11.53 + 7.85 μmol FFA released/ml/h, P < 0.05) whereas plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity was significantly increased (8.15 ± 1.81 versus 5.54 ± 1.86 pmol/μl/h, P < 0.001). Both GH and IGF-I were significantly associated with HL, LPL and CETP activities. Multivariate analysis on this relatively small sample size showed that in normal subjects, triglyceride and HL activity were the major determinants of LDL-III. In contrast, GH and HDL were the main determinants in acromegaly, accounting for 32 and 24% in the variability of LDL-III respectively. In conclusion, GH excess has a direct effect on LDL subfraction distribution.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atherosclerosisen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAtherosclerosisen_HK
dc.rightsAtherosclerosis. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAcromegaly - blood - drug therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshApolipoproteins - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshBromocriptine - therapeutic useen_HK
dc.subject.meshCarrier Proteins - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshCholesterol Ester Transfer Proteinsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, HDL - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids, Nonesterified - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGlycoproteinsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGrowth Hormone - blood - drug effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHormone Antagonists - therapeutic useen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInsulin-Like Growth Factor I - drug effects - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshLipase - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshLipoprotein Lipase - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshLipoproteins, LDL - blood - drug effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshRadioimmunoassayen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTriglycerides - blooden_HK
dc.titleLDL subfractions in acromegaly: Relation to growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-Ien_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0021-9150&volume=129&spage=59&epage=65&date=1997&atitle=LDL+subfractions+in+acromegaly:+relation+to+growth+hormone+and+insulin-like+growth+factor-Ien_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, KCB:kcbtan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL:ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, KCB=rp00402en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0021-9150(96)06015-7en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9069518en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031041840en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros22822en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031041840&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume129en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage59en_HK
dc.identifier.epage65en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997WX81300009-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, KCB=8082703100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShiu, SWM=7005550652en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats