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Article: Peritoneal mesothelial cells and the extracellular matrix

TitlePeritoneal mesothelial cells and the extracellular matrix
Authors
KeywordsContinuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis
Extracellular matrix
Integrins
Metalloproteinases
Peritoneal mesothelial cells
Proteoglycans
Transforming growth factor-β1
Issue Date2001
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/NEP
Citation
Nephrology, 2001, v. 6 n. 6, p. 250-258 How to Cite?
AbstractContinuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CARD) is an important treatment for patients with end-stage renal failure. Long-term success is dependent on the functional and structural integrity of the peritoneal membrane. Conventional peritoneal dialysis fluids are non-physiological. They contain glucose at high concentrations to provide the osmotic drive for Ultrafiltration, lactate to correct the metabolic acidosis of renal failure, and a low pH to prevent caramelization of glucose during heat sterilization. These components, in isolation or acting together, exert adverse influences on both the resident cellular and extracellular elements of the peritoneal membrane, as well as phagocytic cells which infiltrate the peritoneum during inflammation, culminating in detrimental structural and functional effects, compromising the viability of the peritoneum during dialysis. Peritoneal biopsy studies of patients on long-term CARD have demonstrated an intercellular space between adjacent mesothelial cells which allows the penetration of peritoneal dialysis fluid into the underlying submesothelium. This, together with episodes of peritonitis, can initiate a chronic inflammatory reaction within the peritoneum characterized by increased synthesis of matrix proteins. Perturbation of the regulatory mechanisms which govern the balance of synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix can lead to progressive fibrosis. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) have been shown to synthesize fibronectin, laminin, collagens, proteoglycans and hyaluronan in vitro, and thus play a role in the pathogenesis of peritoneal fibrosis. This review will give an overview of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis by HPMC, how changes in the synthesis are affected by CAPD and postulate how these changes can compromise the dialytic properties of the peritoneum.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78218
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.796
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.894
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYung, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, TMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:40:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:40:27Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNephrology, 2001, v. 6 n. 6, p. 250-258en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1320-5358en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78218-
dc.description.abstractContinuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CARD) is an important treatment for patients with end-stage renal failure. Long-term success is dependent on the functional and structural integrity of the peritoneal membrane. Conventional peritoneal dialysis fluids are non-physiological. They contain glucose at high concentrations to provide the osmotic drive for Ultrafiltration, lactate to correct the metabolic acidosis of renal failure, and a low pH to prevent caramelization of glucose during heat sterilization. These components, in isolation or acting together, exert adverse influences on both the resident cellular and extracellular elements of the peritoneal membrane, as well as phagocytic cells which infiltrate the peritoneum during inflammation, culminating in detrimental structural and functional effects, compromising the viability of the peritoneum during dialysis. Peritoneal biopsy studies of patients on long-term CARD have demonstrated an intercellular space between adjacent mesothelial cells which allows the penetration of peritoneal dialysis fluid into the underlying submesothelium. This, together with episodes of peritonitis, can initiate a chronic inflammatory reaction within the peritoneum characterized by increased synthesis of matrix proteins. Perturbation of the regulatory mechanisms which govern the balance of synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix can lead to progressive fibrosis. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) have been shown to synthesize fibronectin, laminin, collagens, proteoglycans and hyaluronan in vitro, and thus play a role in the pathogenesis of peritoneal fibrosis. This review will give an overview of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis by HPMC, how changes in the synthesis are affected by CAPD and postulate how these changes can compromise the dialytic properties of the peritoneum.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/NEPen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNephrologyen_HK
dc.subjectContinuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysisen_HK
dc.subjectExtracellular matrixen_HK
dc.subjectIntegrinsen_HK
dc.subjectMetalloproteinasesen_HK
dc.subjectPeritoneal mesothelial cellsen_HK
dc.subjectProteoglycansen_HK
dc.subjectTransforming growth factor-β1en_HK
dc.titlePeritoneal mesothelial cells and the extracellular matrixen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1320-5358&volume=6&spage=250&epage=258&date=2001&atitle=Peritoneal+mesothelial+cells+and+the+extracellular+matrixen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYung, S:ssyyung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, TM:dtmchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYung, S=rp00455en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, TM=rp00394en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0005433548en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros105363en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0005433548&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage250en_HK
dc.identifier.epage258en_HK
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYung, S=22636568800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TM=7402687700en_HK

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