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Article: Glycosaminoglycans and the peritoneum

TitleGlycosaminoglycans and the peritoneum
Authors
KeywordsGlycosaminoglycans
Heparin
Hyaluronan
Mesothelial cells
Peritoneal dialysis
Proteoglycans
Issue Date2002
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/NEP
Citation
Nephrology, 2002, v. 7 n. 5, p. 211-215 How to Cite?
AbstractThe introduction of peritoneal dialysis (PD) over two decades ago has allowed us to manipulate the peritoneal membrane to perform as a continuous dialysing organ. To maximize the efficacy of solute transport and waste removal, conventional PD fluids require unphysiological concentrations of glucose to provide the osmotic drive, lactate to alleviate metabolic acidosis, and a low pH to prevent the caramelization of glucose during the preparation of the solutions. These factors either alone or in combination, are irritants to the peritoneal membrane. Thus, continuous exposure of the peritoneum to PD solutions, together with frequent episodes of peritonitis confers a chronic inflammatory response within the peritoneum. It is, therefore, not unexpected that with time, long-term PD patients develop structural and functional changes within the peritoneum, which in many cases develop into peritoneal fibrosis of varying degrees and compromises the peritoneal membrane as a dialysing organ. To date, numerous studies have investigated methods to improve the efficiency of PD and preserve the structure of the peritoneal membrane. Recently, a number of reports have documented the beneficial effects of intraperitoneal administration of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on both the structural and functional qualities of the peritoneum. In this context, GAGs have been demonstrated to inhibit collagen synthesis within the peritoneum, decrease peritoneal advanced glycosylated end-products (AGE) deposition, and modulate cytokine and growth factor synthesis. This review will examine the available data with regards to the potential role of GAGs in maintaining ultrafiltration, solute transport and the structural integrity of the peritoneum.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78187
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.796
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.894
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYung, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, TMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:40:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:40:07Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNephrology, 2002, v. 7 n. 5, p. 211-215en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1320-5358en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78187-
dc.description.abstractThe introduction of peritoneal dialysis (PD) over two decades ago has allowed us to manipulate the peritoneal membrane to perform as a continuous dialysing organ. To maximize the efficacy of solute transport and waste removal, conventional PD fluids require unphysiological concentrations of glucose to provide the osmotic drive, lactate to alleviate metabolic acidosis, and a low pH to prevent the caramelization of glucose during the preparation of the solutions. These factors either alone or in combination, are irritants to the peritoneal membrane. Thus, continuous exposure of the peritoneum to PD solutions, together with frequent episodes of peritonitis confers a chronic inflammatory response within the peritoneum. It is, therefore, not unexpected that with time, long-term PD patients develop structural and functional changes within the peritoneum, which in many cases develop into peritoneal fibrosis of varying degrees and compromises the peritoneal membrane as a dialysing organ. To date, numerous studies have investigated methods to improve the efficiency of PD and preserve the structure of the peritoneal membrane. Recently, a number of reports have documented the beneficial effects of intraperitoneal administration of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on both the structural and functional qualities of the peritoneum. In this context, GAGs have been demonstrated to inhibit collagen synthesis within the peritoneum, decrease peritoneal advanced glycosylated end-products (AGE) deposition, and modulate cytokine and growth factor synthesis. This review will examine the available data with regards to the potential role of GAGs in maintaining ultrafiltration, solute transport and the structural integrity of the peritoneum.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/NEPen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNephrologyen_HK
dc.subjectGlycosaminoglycansen_HK
dc.subjectHeparinen_HK
dc.subjectHyaluronanen_HK
dc.subjectMesothelial cellsen_HK
dc.subjectPeritoneal dialysisen_HK
dc.subjectProteoglycansen_HK
dc.titleGlycosaminoglycans and the peritoneumen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1320-5358&volume=7&spage=211&epage=215&date=2002&atitle=Glycosaminoglycans+and+the+peritoneumen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYung, S:ssyyung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, TM:dtmchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYung, S=rp00455en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, TM=rp00394en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1440-1797.2002.00115.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036043007en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros79053en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036043007&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage211en_HK
dc.identifier.epage215en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177776200001-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYung, S=22636568800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TM=7402687700en_HK

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