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Conference Paper: Obesity as the key player in the metabolic syndrome

TitleObesity as the key player in the metabolic syndrome
Authors
KeywordsMetabolic syndrome
Chinese
Obesity
Adiponectin
C-reactive protein
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ics
Citation
Atherosclerosis XIII. Proceedings of the 13th International Atherosclerosis Symposium, Kyoto, Japan, 28 September–2 October 2003. In International Congress Series, 2004, v. 1262, p. 542-545 How to Cite?
AbstractMetabolic syndrome is a common cardiovascular risk factor in urbanized areas in China. In Hong Kong, it affects 17.1% of the population, increasing to 21.9% if the lower IOTF Asian cut-off values for central obesity were used. This is probably related to the increasing prevalence of excess adiposity. Epidemiological studies, cross-sectional and prospective, suggest that obesity plays a key role in metabolic syndrome in the Chinese, although other factors, such as genetic causes, may also enhance its development. Recent data, including those from Hong Kong and Taiwan, suggest that the adipocytokines, especially adiponectin, provide important links between obesity and various components of metabolic syndrome, through effects on insulin sensitivity, fatty acid synthesis and oxidation, nitric oxide production and inflammatory responses. Raised levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of low-grade chronic inflammation, are independently associated with obesity and predict the development of diabetes in the Chinese. Increased fat in the upper airway also predisposes to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), sympathetic activation and insulin resistance, accounting for the high prevalence of “Syndrome Z” (metabolic syndrome plus obstructive sleep apnea). Appropriate weight control with regular physical exercise and a healthy diet is, therefore, the best prevention and treatment for metabolic syndrome.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77845
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWat, NMSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:36:22Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:36:22Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAtherosclerosis XIII. Proceedings of the 13th International Atherosclerosis Symposium, Kyoto, Japan, 28 September–2 October 2003. In International Congress Series, 2004, v. 1262, p. 542-545en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0531-5131en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77845-
dc.description.abstractMetabolic syndrome is a common cardiovascular risk factor in urbanized areas in China. In Hong Kong, it affects 17.1% of the population, increasing to 21.9% if the lower IOTF Asian cut-off values for central obesity were used. This is probably related to the increasing prevalence of excess adiposity. Epidemiological studies, cross-sectional and prospective, suggest that obesity plays a key role in metabolic syndrome in the Chinese, although other factors, such as genetic causes, may also enhance its development. Recent data, including those from Hong Kong and Taiwan, suggest that the adipocytokines, especially adiponectin, provide important links between obesity and various components of metabolic syndrome, through effects on insulin sensitivity, fatty acid synthesis and oxidation, nitric oxide production and inflammatory responses. Raised levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of low-grade chronic inflammation, are independently associated with obesity and predict the development of diabetes in the Chinese. Increased fat in the upper airway also predisposes to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), sympathetic activation and insulin resistance, accounting for the high prevalence of “Syndrome Z” (metabolic syndrome plus obstructive sleep apnea). Appropriate weight control with regular physical exercise and a healthy diet is, therefore, the best prevention and treatment for metabolic syndrome.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/icsen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Congress Seriesen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Congress Series. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectMetabolic syndrome-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectObesity-
dc.subjectAdiponectin-
dc.subjectC-reactive protein-
dc.titleObesity as the key player in the metabolic syndromeen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0531-5131&volume=1262&spage=542&epage=5&date=2004&atitle=Obesity+as+the+key+player+in+the+metabolic+syndromeen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailXu, A: amxu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWat, NMS: nmswat@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTso, AWK: awktso@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM: msmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityXu, A=rp00485en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTso, AWK=rp00535en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ics.2003.11.006-
dc.identifier.hkuros91114en_HK
dc.identifier.volume1262-
dc.identifier.spage542-
dc.identifier.epage545-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-
dc.description.otherAtherosclerosis XIII. Proceedings of the 13th International Atherosclerosis Symposium, Kyoto, Japan, 28 September–2 October 2003. In International Congress Series, 2004, v. 1262, p. 542-545-

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