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Article: Resistin gene polymorphisms and progression of glycaemia in southern Chinese: A 5-year prospective study

TitleResistin gene polymorphisms and progression of glycaemia in southern Chinese: A 5-year prospective study
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 2007, v. 66 n. 2, p. 211-217 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Human resistin gene (RETN) polymorphisms have been found to be associated with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), insulin resistance and/or obesity. We evaluated, in a 5-year prospective study, whether RETN polymorphisms could predict the progression of glycaemia in southern Chinese. Design and patients: We conducted a systematic search for variants in RETN in 70 southern Chinese subjects. This was followed by the genotyping in 624 unrelated nondiabetic subjects of two polymorphisms, -420C→G and +62G→A, previously reported in cross-sectional studies to be associated with T2DM in Asians, to examine their relationship with the progression of glycaemia in this cohort. Results: We identified 15 polymorphisms, including 2 novel but rare polymorphisms (-319G→A and +63G→C). Compared to subjects with the CC genotype, -420GG subjects had higher 2-h glucose (7.7 ± 1.8 vs. 7.2 ± 2.0 mmol/l, P = 0.011) and insulin (101.6 ± 69.5 vs. 79.8 ± 59.5 mU/l, P = 0.021) during an oral glucose tolerance test. Carriers of the +62A allele had higher body mass indices (25.3 ± 4.0 vs. 24.5 ± 3.6 kg/m 2 in GG, P = 0.02). The presence of the allele -420G (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.28-3.60, P = 0.004) or +62A (OR1.86, 95% CI 1.08-3.21, P = 0.025) predicted the progression of glycaemia at Year 5, after adjustment for sex, age or body mass index. The haplotype G-A also conferred a higher risk of progression in glycaemia (P = 0.002). Conclusion: Our study would support the role of the resistin gene in obesity, insulin resistance and progression of glycaemia in southern Chinese. © 2006 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77605
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, JYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWat, NMSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, CHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:33:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:33:43Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 2007, v. 66 n. 2, p. 211-217en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77605-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Human resistin gene (RETN) polymorphisms have been found to be associated with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), insulin resistance and/or obesity. We evaluated, in a 5-year prospective study, whether RETN polymorphisms could predict the progression of glycaemia in southern Chinese. Design and patients: We conducted a systematic search for variants in RETN in 70 southern Chinese subjects. This was followed by the genotyping in 624 unrelated nondiabetic subjects of two polymorphisms, -420C→G and +62G→A, previously reported in cross-sectional studies to be associated with T2DM in Asians, to examine their relationship with the progression of glycaemia in this cohort. Results: We identified 15 polymorphisms, including 2 novel but rare polymorphisms (-319G→A and +63G→C). Compared to subjects with the CC genotype, -420GG subjects had higher 2-h glucose (7.7 ± 1.8 vs. 7.2 ± 2.0 mmol/l, P = 0.011) and insulin (101.6 ± 69.5 vs. 79.8 ± 59.5 mU/l, P = 0.021) during an oral glucose tolerance test. Carriers of the +62A allele had higher body mass indices (25.3 ± 4.0 vs. 24.5 ± 3.6 kg/m 2 in GG, P = 0.02). The presence of the allele -420G (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.28-3.60, P = 0.004) or +62A (OR1.86, 95% CI 1.08-3.21, P = 0.025) predicted the progression of glycaemia at Year 5, after adjustment for sex, age or body mass index. The haplotype G-A also conferred a higher risk of progression in glycaemia (P = 0.002). Conclusion: Our study would support the role of the resistin gene in obesity, insulin resistance and progression of glycaemia in southern Chinese. © 2006 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.rightsClinical Endocrinology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshChinaen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Progressionen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGene Frequencyen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHyperglycemia - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistance - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshObesity - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Single Nucleotideen_HK
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshResistin - geneticsen_HK
dc.titleResistin gene polymorphisms and progression of glycaemia in southern Chinese: A 5-year prospective studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-0664&volume=66&spage=211&epage=7&date=2007&atitle=Resistin+gene+polymorphisms+and+progression+of+glycaemia+in+southern+Chinese:+a+5-year+prospective+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailXu, A: amxu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTso, AWK: awk.tso@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheng, KY: dorncky@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityXu, A=rp00485en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTso, AWK=rp00535en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, KY=rp01672en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.2006.02710.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17223990-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846185902en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros126068en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros151803-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846185902&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume66en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage211en_HK
dc.identifier.epage217en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243441600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, JY=8947805200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, A=7202655409en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTso, AWK=6701371436en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWat, NMS=6602131754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KY=7402997599en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, CHY=14033917100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1048000-

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