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Article: Applicability of living donor liver transplantation to high-urgency patients

TitleApplicability of living donor liver transplantation to high-urgency patients
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.com
Citation
Transplantation, 1999, v. 67 n. 1, p. 73-77 How to Cite?
Abstract
Background. Cadaveric liver donors are scarce in Hong Kong, and the application of liver transplantation to high-urgency patients is limited. We evaluated the use of grafts from living donors in this setting. Methods. From July 1994 to January 1998, 49 consecutive adult patients who were intensive care unit-bound because of acute or chronic liver failure were put on a high- urgency list for liver transplantation. Family members were not solicited for living donation, and the initiation and decision for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) was based on the donor's voluntary intent. Assessment of the living donor, including blood tests, computed tomographic volumetry, and angiography, was performed only after informed consent was executed. Results. In 25 of 49 (51%) patients, no family member volunteered as living donor; 23 died awaiting donor organs, and 2 received a cadaveric graft. Twenty-four (49%) patients had 36 family members who volunteered as living donors. Before evaluation of living donor was completed, two patients received a cadaveric liver transplant. LDLT was not performed in nine patients because of recipient contraindications (n=4), ABO blood group incompatibility (n=3), and withdrawal of donor (n=2). Eight of these nine patients died, and one received a cadaveric liver graft. The remaining 13 (27%) patients received grafts from living donors. Four of 5 (80%) patients who underwent cadaveric liver transplantation and 11 of 13 (85%) who underwent LDLT survived. Thus, emergency transplantation from living donors increased the applicability of liver transplantation from 10% to 37%, and the survival rate after emergency LDLT (85%) was superior to that of the remaining patients (11%). Conclusions. When cadaveric organ donation is scarce, emergency liver transplantation from living donors can be applied to high-urgency adult patients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76306
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.535
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.609
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, STen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, JKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, GKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:19:50Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:19:50Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTransplantation, 1999, v. 67 n. 1, p. 73-77en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0041-1337en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/76306-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Cadaveric liver donors are scarce in Hong Kong, and the application of liver transplantation to high-urgency patients is limited. We evaluated the use of grafts from living donors in this setting. Methods. From July 1994 to January 1998, 49 consecutive adult patients who were intensive care unit-bound because of acute or chronic liver failure were put on a high- urgency list for liver transplantation. Family members were not solicited for living donation, and the initiation and decision for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) was based on the donor's voluntary intent. Assessment of the living donor, including blood tests, computed tomographic volumetry, and angiography, was performed only after informed consent was executed. Results. In 25 of 49 (51%) patients, no family member volunteered as living donor; 23 died awaiting donor organs, and 2 received a cadaveric graft. Twenty-four (49%) patients had 36 family members who volunteered as living donors. Before evaluation of living donor was completed, two patients received a cadaveric liver transplant. LDLT was not performed in nine patients because of recipient contraindications (n=4), ABO blood group incompatibility (n=3), and withdrawal of donor (n=2). Eight of these nine patients died, and one received a cadaveric liver graft. The remaining 13 (27%) patients received grafts from living donors. Four of 5 (80%) patients who underwent cadaveric liver transplantation and 11 of 13 (85%) who underwent LDLT survived. Thus, emergency transplantation from living donors increased the applicability of liver transplantation from 10% to 37%, and the survival rate after emergency LDLT (85%) was superior to that of the remaining patients (11%). Conclusions. When cadaveric organ donation is scarce, emergency liver transplantation from living donors can be applied to high-urgency adult patients.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.transplantjournal.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTransplantationen_HK
dc.rightsTransplantation. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshCadaveren_HK
dc.subject.meshEmergency Medical Servicesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLiver Failure - surgeryen_HK
dc.subject.meshLiver Transplantationen_HK
dc.subject.meshLiving Donorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_HK
dc.subject.meshWaiting Listsen_HK
dc.titleApplicability of living donor liver transplantation to high-urgency patientsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0041-1337&volume=67&spage=73&epage=77&date=1999&atitle=Applicability+of+living+donor+liver+transplantation+to+high-urgency+patientsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, CM: chungmlo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFan, ST: stfan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, CL: hrmelcl@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, J: jwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, CM=rp00412en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFan, ST=rp00355en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, CL=rp00314en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, J=rp00322en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/00007890-199901150-00012en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9921799en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033556468en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros39518en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033556468&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume67en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage73en_HK
dc.identifier.epage77en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000078118300012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, CM=7401771672en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, ST=7402678224en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, CL=7409789712en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JK=7403287057en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, CL=7403086396en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, GK=7102301257en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, J=8049324500en_HK

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