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Article: White matter anisotropy in post-treatment childhood cancer survivors: Preliminary evidence of association with neurocognitive function

TitleWhite matter anisotropy in post-treatment childhood cancer survivors: Preliminary evidence of association with neurocognitive function
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jco.org/
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Oncology, 2006, v. 24 n. 6, p. 884-890 How to Cite?
Abstract
Purpose: We aim to determine if the loss of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), measured by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI), in post-treatment childhood medulloblastoma (MED) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors correlate with intelligence quotient (IQ) scores. Materials and Methods: MED and ALL survivors (n = 30; 20 male, 10 female; age range, 6.0 to 22.1 years; mean, 13.1 years) were recruited for DTI and IQ tests. In this cross-sectional study, age-matched normal control (n = 55; 32 male, 23 female; age range, 6.0 to 23 years; mean, 12.1 years) DTI was obtained to compute percentage difference in white matter FA (AFA%) for each patient compared with the age-matched control group. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine the relationships between AFA%, age at treatment, irradiation dose, time interval from treatment, and full-scale IQ (FSIQ), verbal IQ (VIQ), and performance IQ (PIQ). Receiver operating characteristics curves were used to determine the best AFA% cutoffs for predicting FSIQ, VIQ, and PIQ of less than 85. Results: AFA% had a significant effect on FSIQ (adjusted r 2 = 0.439; P < .001), VIQ (adjusted r 2 = 0.237; P = .028), and PIQ (adjusted r 2 = 0.491; P < .001) after adjusting for the effects of age at treatment, irradiation dose, and time interval from treatment. The best AFA% value to predict less than 85 scores in FSIQ, VIQ, and PIQ was -3.3% with specificities of 100% and sensitivities ranging from 77.8% to 87.5%. Conclusion: Our preliminary findings suggest that white matter FA may be a clinically useful biomarker for the assessment of treatment-related neurotoxicity in post-treatment childhood cancer survivors. © 2006 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71903
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 17.879
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, LHTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, ASMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, DLWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOoi, GCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcAlanon, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCao, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, GCFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T06:36:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T06:36:19Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Oncology, 2006, v. 24 n. 6, p. 884-890en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0732-183Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/71903-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: We aim to determine if the loss of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), measured by diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI), in post-treatment childhood medulloblastoma (MED) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors correlate with intelligence quotient (IQ) scores. Materials and Methods: MED and ALL survivors (n = 30; 20 male, 10 female; age range, 6.0 to 22.1 years; mean, 13.1 years) were recruited for DTI and IQ tests. In this cross-sectional study, age-matched normal control (n = 55; 32 male, 23 female; age range, 6.0 to 23 years; mean, 12.1 years) DTI was obtained to compute percentage difference in white matter FA (AFA%) for each patient compared with the age-matched control group. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine the relationships between AFA%, age at treatment, irradiation dose, time interval from treatment, and full-scale IQ (FSIQ), verbal IQ (VIQ), and performance IQ (PIQ). Receiver operating characteristics curves were used to determine the best AFA% cutoffs for predicting FSIQ, VIQ, and PIQ of less than 85. Results: AFA% had a significant effect on FSIQ (adjusted r 2 = 0.439; P < .001), VIQ (adjusted r 2 = 0.237; P = .028), and PIQ (adjusted r 2 = 0.491; P < .001) after adjusting for the effects of age at treatment, irradiation dose, and time interval from treatment. The best AFA% value to predict less than 85 scores in FSIQ, VIQ, and PIQ was -3.3% with specificities of 100% and sensitivities ranging from 77.8% to 87.5%. Conclusion: Our preliminary findings suggest that white matter FA may be a clinically useful biomarker for the assessment of treatment-related neurotoxicity in post-treatment childhood cancer survivors. © 2006 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jco.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Oncologyen_HK
dc.titleWhite matter anisotropy in post-treatment childhood cancer survivors: Preliminary evidence of association with neurocognitive functionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0732-183X&volume=24&issue=6&spage=884&epage=890&date=2006&atitle=White+Matter+Anisotropy+in+Post-Treatment+Childhood+Cancer+Survivors:+Preliminary+Evidence+of+Association+With+Neurocognitive+Functionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKhong, PL: plkhong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwong, DLW: dlwkwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcAlanon, G: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, GCF: gcfchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKhong, PL=rp00467en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, DLW=rp00414en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlanon, G=rp00475en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, GCF=rp00431en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1200/JCO.2005.02.4505en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16484697-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644907754en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros114548en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644907754&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage884en_HK
dc.identifier.epage890en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1527-7755-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235469700011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhong, PL=7006693233en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, LHT=7202048113en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, ASM=8728678800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, DYT=35261710300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiu, D=12778150600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, DLW=15744231600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOoi, GC=16239781100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcAlanon, G=6603123011en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCao, G=12776387400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, GCF=16160154400en_HK

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