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Conference Paper: 'Skipped' Level Disc Degeneration of The Lumbar Spine: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors

Title'Skipped' Level Disc Degeneration of The Lumbar Spine: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherInternational Society of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology.
Citation
SICOT/SIROT 2008 XXIV Triennial World Congress, Hong Kong, 24-28 August 2008, p. abstract no. 18449 How to Cite?
AbstractClinical observations suggest that subjects occasionally exhibit a pattern involving non-consecutive ('skipped') levels of lumbar degenerative disc disease (SLDDD). This study aims to address this unpublished issue by examining its prevalence and associated clinical and radiological factors. As part of a large population-based genetic study in Southern Chinese (n=1,989), subjects exhibiting DDD more than two levels (n=838) were grouped into SLDDD (n=174) and non-SLDDD (n=664). SLDDD were classified into five types by the relative location of healthy disc(s) (HD) to DDD levels. Subject demographics and clinical profiles were collected by questionnaire. SLDDD was present in 8.7% and 20.8% of the overall and DDD population, respectively, and more prevalent in males by the relative location of healthy disc(s) (HD) to DDD levels. Subject demographics and clinical profiles were collected by questionnaire. SLDDD was present in 8.7% and 20.8% of the overall and DDD population, respectively, and more prevalent in males (OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1-2.2; p=0.008). Type 1 (38%; one DDD level above and below HD) and Type 2 (32%; one level above and multi-levels of DDD below HD) were the most common types. SLDDD was significantly associated with the presence of Schmorl's node (p =0.0001), which also presented in non-DDD levels. Interestingly, disc bulge/extrusion, back injury history and pain profiles were significantly associated with non-SLDDD (p<0.05). Other demographics, MRI findings and clinical profiles did not significantly differ between groups (p>0.05). This study is the first to describe SLDDD. While its etiology remains unknown, altered spinal biomechanics associated with SLDDD might account for less pronounced clinical symptoms. The understanding of SLDDD may shed light on the cause of back pain.
DescriptionSession: Spine: degenerative spine
Oral presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/64100

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarppinen, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMok, FPSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T04:40:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T04:40:05Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSICOT/SIROT 2008 XXIV Triennial World Congress, Hong Kong, 24-28 August 2008, p. abstract no. 18449-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/64100-
dc.descriptionSession: Spine: degenerative spineen_HK
dc.descriptionOral presentation-
dc.description.abstractClinical observations suggest that subjects occasionally exhibit a pattern involving non-consecutive ('skipped') levels of lumbar degenerative disc disease (SLDDD). This study aims to address this unpublished issue by examining its prevalence and associated clinical and radiological factors. As part of a large population-based genetic study in Southern Chinese (n=1,989), subjects exhibiting DDD more than two levels (n=838) were grouped into SLDDD (n=174) and non-SLDDD (n=664). SLDDD were classified into five types by the relative location of healthy disc(s) (HD) to DDD levels. Subject demographics and clinical profiles were collected by questionnaire. SLDDD was present in 8.7% and 20.8% of the overall and DDD population, respectively, and more prevalent in males by the relative location of healthy disc(s) (HD) to DDD levels. Subject demographics and clinical profiles were collected by questionnaire. SLDDD was present in 8.7% and 20.8% of the overall and DDD population, respectively, and more prevalent in males (OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1-2.2; p=0.008). Type 1 (38%; one DDD level above and below HD) and Type 2 (32%; one level above and multi-levels of DDD below HD) were the most common types. SLDDD was significantly associated with the presence of Schmorl's node (p =0.0001), which also presented in non-DDD levels. Interestingly, disc bulge/extrusion, back injury history and pain profiles were significantly associated with non-SLDDD (p<0.05). Other demographics, MRI findings and clinical profiles did not significantly differ between groups (p>0.05). This study is the first to describe SLDDD. While its etiology remains unknown, altered spinal biomechanics associated with SLDDD might account for less pronounced clinical symptoms. The understanding of SLDDD may shed light on the cause of back pain.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInternational Society of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology.-
dc.relation.ispartofSICOT/SIROT World Congress-
dc.title'Skipped' Level Disc Degeneration of The Lumbar Spine: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factorsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hrmoldk@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros167382en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros166136-
dc.identifier.spageabstract no. 18449-
dc.identifier.epageabstract no. 18449-
dc.publisher.placeFrance-

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